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Jeremy Lin of Harvard 
Author: NOODLESTYLE 
Posted: 12/13 4:15 AM 
 
He's had big games against UCONN and Boston College this season, which he had against BC last season as well.

6'3 200 lbs. I think he could develop under the triangle system, especially under the guidance of Derek Fisher. 2nd rd pick, camp invite, or d-league call up perhaps?

Highlights for the Bob Cousy Award:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVVzGm8SbOM

Video highlights of Jeremy Lin against Uconn:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQ2mng5e95w

#6 - Jeremy Lin buzzer beater:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5laQcZ4MH8

Jeremy Lin blocks Jerome Dyson:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_Y7xdP6WZQ

Jeremy Lin scores on Greg Monroe:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZPwWlLJDJ0

Jeremy Lin steal and dunk:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FWKm6JTp-8

http://gocrimson.com/sports/mbkb/2009-10/releases/091210_MBB_Quotes

Highlights of Jeremy Lin's first game at Portsmouth:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhtCFJif8kE&feature=player_embedded

Quote:
Recent Quotes on Jeremy Lin:
"He's a terrific basketball player. What I really like about him is he's athletic, more than you think so. He controls his temperament to a really nice tempo. He knows how to play. He's one of the better kids, including BIG EAST guards, who have come in here in quite some time...I really love his composure." - Connecticut Head Coach Jim Calhoun

"There are a lot of teams that come through here... I can't think of a team that he wouldn't play for." - Connecticut Head Coach Jim Calhoun

"(Jeremy Lin) really has great, great composure on the court; he's got change-of-pace dribbles; he's really, really good." - Connecticut Head Coach Jim Calhoun

"A player that continues to be overlooked nationally: Jeremy Lin of Harvard. All he did was go for a career-high 30 points, nine rebounds and three assists in a 79-73 loss at Connecticut. The race between Cornell's Ryan Wittman and Lin for Ivy League player of the year will be quite a chase." - ESPN commentator Andy Katz

"Lin can play anywhere, in any league." - ESPN commentator Jay Bilas

"Harvard guard Jeremy Lin put on a show in Storrs on Sunday, contributing a career-high 30 points and nine rebounds as his Crimson hung around all afternoon before losing 79-73 to 13th-ranked Connecticut." - ESPN commentator Andy Katz

"Jeremy Lin is fearless in the lane and a legit playmaker, drawing so much attention as the Crimson's legit threat that he attracts a crowd, opening up his teammates for easy buckets. He finished with 30 points and nine rebounds, and for at least this game, was by far the best player on the court." - ESPN columnist Dana O'Neill

"For some folks who haven't seen [Lin] play, you're probably wowed by some of the things he can do-we are." - head coach Tommy Amaker.

"That's the best complement I can give him, that what you saw this afternoon out of him is who he is. I think he's as good of a guard as there is." - head coach Tommy Amaker.

"Jeremy Lin, Harvard's spectacular guard, is perhaps the primary reason UConn had such difficulty Sunday afternoon... (he) streaked upcourt for emphatic dunks, played with grace and determination and gave the Huskies all they could handle right up to the final buzzer." - Mike Anthony, Hartford Courant

"He's a great player. I'm definitely tired after this one." - UConn guard Jerome Dyson

"FOXSPORTS.COM STUD OF THE NIGHT: There were plenty of candidates, but I've got to go with Harvard senior guard Jeremy Lin - who finished with 25 points in the Crimson's upset at Boston College." - Fox Commentator Jeff Goodman

"Jeremy Lin can really play" - ESPNBoston.com Columnist Brian McPherson

"...he's plenty athletic. Lin explodes at the hoop and can finish above the rim, and he has built his body into a strong physical specimen that can withstand contact."- ESPN analyst Doug Gottlieb

"Jeremy Lin reminds me of Santa Clara's Steve Nash circa 1996. Hair cut, deceptive athlete." - ESPN analyst Fran Fraschilla

"Lin is not a pure shooter, but he has really solid fundamentals on his jumper and can elevate -- especially going right -- while maintaining great balance. Probably the most impressive part of the Harvard star's game is that his coach, Tommy Amaker, so desperately wants to get others involved that Lin is not really the focus of the team's offense for most of the first half. Yet he still puts up the numbers he does." - ESPN analyst Dou


 
Author: Mike@LG 
Posted: 12/13 3:02 PM 
 
That change of pace dribble with an improved jumpshot would get him drafted.


 
Author: grimmz4764 
Posted: 12/13 3:08 PM 
 
I would love to see an Asian-American succeed in the NBA and on the Lakers.


 
Author: Mike@LG 
Posted: 12/13 3:42 PM 
 
He keeps his dribble below the waist which is a huge advantage for him.

He's aggressive attacking the basket.

Sub average vert.

Good first step and keeps his defender at his hip when attacking the basket.

Will need to play a high energy game (like Nash; constant movement) if he really wants to make it into a professional league.

Slight elbow out on the jumpshot, big quirk that could actually increase his FG% with a shooting coach.

Needs a running start to explode to the hoop.

Really surprises with speed.

Very good bball IQ, keeps defenders off-balance, simple, efficient moves to the basket, doesn't interrupt offensive system with Iso play, use of opponent to "shield/screen" his own defender attack the basket.


 
Author: AllorNothing 
Posted: 12/18 8:39 AM 
 
How is his court vision and passing? Looks like a shoot first guard. He does have very deceptive speed. Looks slow but has a second gear.


 
Author: Mike@LG 
Posted: 12/18 9:11 AM 
 
AllorNothing wrote:
How is his court vision and passing? Looks like a shoot first guard. He does have very deceptive speed. Looks slow but has a second gear.


He's not a bonafide true point guard, but he is unselfish.


 
Author: NOODLESTYLE 
Posted: 12/18 9:27 AM 
 
AllorNothing wrote:
How is his court vision and passing? Looks like a shoot first guard. He does have very deceptive speed. Looks slow but has a second gear.


He played PG a lot in high school supposedly. However, he's more of a slasher and looks to score because his team relies on his scoring, but he definitely tries gets his teammates involved. Last season when they played Boston College (the team who had the upset over North Carolina), he got 27 points, 8 assists, 6 steals, 3 rebounds and 2 blocks in an 82-70 upset win


 
Author: NOODLESTYLE 
Posted: 12/25 10:21 AM 
 
http://www.draftexpress.com/article/NCAA-Weekly-Performers-121809-3359/
Quote:
Jonathan Givony

It’s not often that a player from the Ivy League conference is able to break through and establish himself as a legitimate NBA draft prospect, but that’s exactly what Jeremy Lin has done this season. Strong performances against UConn (in a narrow loss) and Boston College (a road win) have propelled him directly into the national spotlight, culminating in a feature story on ESPN.com last week.

Lin’s physical tools are less than ideal when compared with most NBA guard prospects, as he’s a 6-3 combo guard with a narrow, but strong frame that he’s absolutely made the most of, and a wingspan that appears to be below average. He has good, but not great athleticism, showing very nice quickness in the open floor and some solid leaping ability, but clearly isn’t the most explosive player around.

Offensively, Lin is an exceptionally efficient player, shooting 60% from inside the arc and 37% from outside it, while getting to the free throw line at a terrific rate—almost 10 times per-40 minutes pace adjusted. He is not what you would call a stellar ball-handler, but is excellent on the pick and roll and is very aggressive looking to get to the basket.

Although he plays mostly off the ball for Harvard, he is pretty much their main facilitator and clearly the player his teammates look to early and often. He executes his team’s plays extremely well and is highly unselfish, showing very nice court vision whipping crisp passes around the court confidently, always looking to make the simple, fundamental play. It would be nice to see Lin get a little more time at the point guard spot for Harvard, but based on what we can tell he seems to have very good instincts as a playmaker.

The one chink in his armor would clearly be his propensity for turnovers, he tends to get called an awful lot for traveling violations, and seems to struggle finishing around the rim in traffic. Lin’s left-hand is noticeably weaker, both creating shots and finishing them, and he generally has trouble in the half-court if he can’t beat his man initially with his very quick (and very long) first step.

As a shooter, Lin sports somewhat unorthodox mechanics, kicking his legs out violently and often fading away excessively on his pull-up jumpers, but is able to make up for that and then some with his innate shot-making ability. He doesn’t take all that many shots from behind the arc—a little over 3.5 per game over the past three years—but he makes the ones he takes at a pretty solid rate, even if there is clearly room for improvement.

One thing that Lin does do exceptionally well is fill up the stat-sheet in every way possible. Besides being a terrific (and extremely efficient) scorer, he generates a large amount of rebounds, assists, steals and blocks, and beyond the numbers seems to have nice toughness and a very good feel for anticipating plays and being around the ball.

Defensively, Lin is a pretty serious guy (as he is in all aspects of the game), but there may be some question marks about his potential here at the NBA level, as he lacks great size or length, and isn’t the strongest or most athletic guy in the world. This is something he will have to really work to dispel in private NBA workouts as he’s matched up with other top guard prospects in one on one, two on two and three on three situations.

Lin has a number of things going for him, and is clearly a prospect teams should take note of. His gaudy stats, strong intangibles and excellent basketball IQ will all work in his favor, but he still has plenty of work ahead of him if he’s to be drafted and/or make an NBA team. Strong showings against the likes of Georgetown, Seattle University and George Washington would surely help his cause, as would making the NCAA tournament, and accepting his invite to play at the Portsmouth Invitational Tournament, a place where he could really help his stock.


 
Author: NOODLESTYLE 
Posted: 12/26 8:53 PM 
 
http://ncaabasketball.fanhouse.com/2009/12/25/lins-legend-grows-carries-harvard-with-it/

Quote:

Jeremy Lin knows that people are talking about him, now more than ever before -- and that largely because of him, they're talking about Harvard basketball more than ever. None of it means he's that comfortable with it, though.

"That's something I have to guard against,'' Lin said Wednesday afternoon. "It's a trap for me to start being able to think about myself, because our team is a true team, team-oriented, and that's how we play. The media, the way they give awards they don't give it to the whole team, but everybody on this team understands what each person needs to do. It's not about what one person does. It's not a one-man show, and everybody understands that.''

Guarding against being swallowed up by the attention, though, might be the most challenging of all the tasks Lin faces this season, because it's not going to stop, not as long as he keeps playing the way he does. The 6-foot-3 senior guard from Palo Alto, Calif., is no longer the best-kept secret in the game, nor are the Crimson able to sneak up on unsuspecting opponents -- not with their 7-3 record that includes a win over Boston College for the second straight year and a near-miss at Connecticut.

In those games, three days apart earlier this month, all Lin did was score 27 and 30 points, respectively, adding to a resume that exceeds what most Ivy League players have done recently, and a legend that has inflated rapidly over the last two seasons. Explosive, acrobatic, fearless, blessed with a full range of abilities but also able to score in bunches when asked to, Lin has made himself impossible to ignore. After averaging 17.8 points a game as a junior and also leading a .500 Harvard team in rebounds, assists and steals, he now is averaging 18.2 a game, he leads the team in the same categories this season -- and has it at 7-3, matching stunning results and upsets with unanimous preseason Ivy favorite Cornell.
"He's one of the better kids, including Big East guards, who have come in here in quite some time ... I can't think of a team he wouldn't play for."

"He's one of the better kids, including Big East guards, who have come in here in quite some time ... I can't think of a team he wouldn't play for,'' marveled Jim Calhoun after Lin had given his Connecticut team fits before it finally subdued Harvard 79-73 on Dec. 6. Added Huskies guard Jerome Dyson, who had to defend him: "He's a great player. I'm definitely tired after this one."

Three days later, when asked how Harvard could beat Boston College twice in one calendar year, including at Chestnut Hill on Dec. 9, coach Al Skinner said, "You've got to give Lin some credit. He's a good player."

So good that Lin -- once a productive high schooler but unheralded recruit and one of the few remaining Crimson players that preceded third-year coach Tommy Amaker -- drew all of Georgetown's attention in Wednesday's game in Washington. Though nominally he's the off-guard, the offense runs through Lin, and setting up teammates didn't work against the Hoyas' smothering defense and long, shot-blocking presences inside (Greg Monroe had five of their eight blocks, plus 16 rebounds). Lin only took 10 shots, made six and led Harvard with 15 points, but that included three uninhibited drives right at Monroe that resulted in twisting, hanging layups -- as well as a soaring dunk to finish a breakaway he began with a steal, and a three-pointer from NBA distance.

More critical to Georgetown's 86-70 win (after breaking away from a 33-all tie late in the first half) was guard Chris Wright's career-high 34 points, which he said was partly due to his and his backcourt mates' challenge of facing someone like Lin. "Jeremy's a great player. He's really hard to guard and he can score in a variety of ways,'' Wright said. "I guess some of the bigger schools underestimated him, but he's really talented.''

Amaker -- for whom Lin is one of three seniors who plays regularly on a roster packed with freshmen and sophomores -- goes one step further: "He's one of the better players in the country. I'm not stretching anything; I feel like I'm qualified to make a statement like that, and I think he's a talented, gifted, passionate basketball player. I love coaching him, and I think he has a very bright future.''


The coach added that he asks a lot of Lin, putting him in the playmaker role and counting on his versatility, unselfishness and leadership. "There's so much he can do, and he wants that,'' Amaker said, "and sometimes I have to spread it out a little bit so he doesn't take on too much at too many moments. But he's after it, he's one of the better players you'll see all year, and he's earned everything he's had coming to him of late.''

Lin doesn't mind shouldering the extra responsibility, since either instinctively or by practice, he shifts the emphasis of questions about him onto the team. For example, if he's noticed all the best-kept secret talk about him.

"You know, I'm not really sure -- it's hard for me to know what everyone else is thinking,'' he said. "I think in general, our team has opened eyes this season in terms of rebuilding, or building a new culture. The coaches and the team are doing a good job of putting Harvard on the map. This is really the first season we've been doing that, so hopefully people are starting to look out for us.''

Indeed, Harvard's last winning season was 2001-02, and its last year with a winning league record was 1996-97. Its last (and only) NCAA tournament berth: 1946. It would have to get through two-time defending Ivy champ, whose 9-2 mark so far includes wins over Alabama, Massachusetts and St. John's. But to lead a program to a breakthrough like that, even Lin might have to acknowledge the kind of player he is.

"We know we have a chance,'' Lin said -- again, sidestepping a query about himself in favor of an answer about his team. "I'm not going to make any promises, but we're gonna work as hard as we can.''


 
Author: NOODLESTYLE 
Posted: 04/16 9:23 AM 
 
http://www.bostonherald.com/blogs/sports/oncampus/?p=211&srvc=home&position=recent

Quote:
Chasing the dream — Jeremy Lin impresses in Portsmouth
This is the first in an occasional series documenting Harvard senior Jeremy Lin’s preparation for the NBA draft. Today’s entry focuses on Lin’s experience at the Portsmouth Invitational Tournament, a four-day event featuring 64 college seniors hoping to reach the NBA.

Though it sounds nice to get “invited” to Portsmouth, a player’s inclusion at this event almost guarantees he won’t wind up in the NBA. The annual tournament has produced some great NBA players in its 58-year history, most notably Rick Barry, Earl Monroe, Dave Cowens, John Stockton and Scottie Pippen. But for every future Hall of Famer, the PIT produces dozens of players destined for overseas careers.

Harvard senior Jeremy Lin probably fits into the latter category. But he headed to Portsmouth last weekend to impress the many NBA scouts and executives that make the annual trek to Virginia for the event.

Playing on a squad with ACC, SEC, Big East and Pac-10 talent, Lin held his own. His Tidewater Sealants squad went 2-1 and the 6-foot-3 guard averaged 10.3 points, 6.0 assists, 1.7 rebounds and 2.7 steals while shooting 60 percent from the field.

“For a kid like him who plays at a lower level, it’s a great way to get acclimated to that (competition),” an NBA executive said. “I thought he more than held his own. I was really impressed with him in terms of what I expected and what I saw.”

NBA talent evaluators weren’t the only ones curious to see how Lin would fare playing with and against high-level players.

“I think I had to prove to myself that I belong and I think my confidence went up every game and I think I got better every game,” Lin said. “That was really fun to do actually, just because it’s a different level of athleticism and speed. I really enjoyed it.”

Though Lin had fun, he said it was stressful playing under the watchful eye of professional scouts, all monitoring and analyzing every play.

“You definitely think about that, but at the same time, it makes it easier when I just try to play my game and I try not to worry too much about anything else,” Lin said. “I just do what I do and showcase my strengths and not try to do anything beyond that.”

Showcases like Portsmouth are completely different than scouting during the college season. At that point, players are (usually) more focused on helping their team win and they’re playing in a comfortable setting with familiar teammates. But in an event specifically designed to showcase players’ talent, there is a tendency for selfish play. Though that’s not Lin’s nature, he said it was a challenge to jell with seven new teammates in a short period of time.

“Obviously chemistry is a huge issue when you play with people you’ve never played with before, but we made it work,” Lin said. “We got a lot more comfortable as the week went along, but obviously that’s one of the tough parts of playing in a tournament like that.”

The next step for Lin will be continuing to work on his game until NBA teams begin holding workouts leading up to the June 24 draft. He’ll have a clearer picture on where he’ll do his training when he hires an agent, which he expects to do in the next week.

While the NBA executive said Lin has a good future in pro basketball, he was referring to a career in Europe or China. Lin is aware that the NBA might be a long shot, but after this weekend he’s determined to continue to follow his dream.

“I think this weekend made me realize that I have a legitimate chance, but I’m not favored to make it or be drafted,” Lin said. “But there’s a chance and I think that’s all I can ask for at his point – to have a chance and so now I’m just going to try to take advantage of that.”


 
Author: NOODLESTYLE 
Posted: 04/16 9:26 AM 
 
http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2010/4/14/lin-pmouth-041410/

Quote:
Lin Aims To Boost Draft Chances
By DENNIS J. ZHENG, CRIMSON STAFF WRITER
Published: Wednesday, April 14, 2010
Consider it a road trip well spent for men’s basketball co-captain Jeremy Lin, who traveled last Wednesday to Portsmouth, Va. to take part in the Portsmouth Invitational, a four-day tournament that allows college seniors the opportunity to improve their professional prospects in front of scouts from around the world.

Playing point guard for the Tidewater Sealants, Lin averaged 10 points and six assists over three games—fourth-best out of the 64 players in attendance. The two-time first-team All-Ivy star was also third in steals to go along with an average of 1.7 rebounds per game.

Lin’s solid showing amidst the likes of Cal’s Jerome Randle and Alabama’s Mikhail Torrance earned him plenty of praise from professional evaluators.

“He’s a guy that I think intrigued a lot of scouts,” said NBA Assistant Director of Scouting Ryan Blake. “He wasn’t the top scorer, wasn’t the top assists leader, but he did all the right things, and I think that’s a plus, especially when you get into an environment like that.”

“I talked to the players before the tournament and said this to all of them, ‘Listen, these teams know you can score, they want to know if you can play basketball’—and I think he proved that this week,” Blake added.

“I thought he got better as the camp went on…it showed that he was able to make adjustments, which speaks to his feel for the game, which is obviously off the charts,” said Jonathan Givony, president of DraftExpress.com. “Probably the best thing he showed is that he’s just an exceptionally smart player, he’s got great court vision, he’s incredibly unselfish…I thought he had a very strong showing there, and I’m sure he helped himself.”

“I think he was one of the better pure point guards out there—not the best,” said Ryan Feldman, the co-founder of The Hoops Report. Feldman awarded Lin a 3rd-team all-tournament spot. “He was more under control than any of the other point guards…he acted like what you want to see out of a point guard.”

“He was impressive in that he didn’t try to do too much to impress everybody,” Feldman said. “He just tried to play his game…and show that he’s a good pure point guard, if that’s what somebody wants.”

Though pleased with how he handled the transition from scorer to the role of point guard, Lin wasn’t entirely satisfied with his overall performance.

“I was happy with some of the things that I did, but I definitely think there are areas for improvement,” Lin said. “I feel okay about it, not great…NBA three-point shooting, ball-handling, and defense—those are probably the three specific things [to work on].”

Next up on the agenda will be hiring an agent.

“I’ve narrowed it down to my final list, and I hope to make a final decision within a week or two,” Lin said.

After that will come the determination of a training location and participation in private workouts before the NBA Draft, which will be held June 24.

“I think he’ll be even more comfortable when he starts going into individual workouts, and when he gets to that, he’ll be able to show other things,” Blake said. “And then of course [he’ll] get an opportunity [to play in] a summer league, where he’s going to be able to play against even stronger players and show teams whether or not he can play.”

Though he impressed many at Portsmouth with his passing skills and ability to finish around the basket, the 6’3’’ Lin remains a long shot for the NBA at this point.

“I really like him, I think he has an opportunity, but we also had a lot of strong point guards in this tournament,” Blake said. “Could we see him in the NBA? Yes, absolutely I could see him in the NBA at some point…Will he get drafted? I don’t know…We have so many players that it’s such a fine line between making it and not making it.”

“For guys like him and 50 other players, there’s just a million different variables, circumstances that need to fall his way in terms of being put in the right situation,” Givony said. “A lot of it has to do with luck…He passed one hurdle, and there’s still a couple more to go. He’s definitely in the picture as far as the NBA is concerned, but he’s not a lock at this point.”

Feldman was less optimistic about Lin’s professional prospects.

“He’s not going to make the NBA, unfortunately,” Feldman said. “He’ll probably get a shot in the summer league with somebody if he wants to, and after that he’ll go to team workouts…and you never know down the road.”

“Right now, he’s probably going to go play somewhere in Europe or Asia,” Feldman said.


 
Author: Mike@LG 
Posted: 04/17 3:18 AM 
 
He plays exactly like a high IQ player that's team oriented. I REALLY like guys like that.

It's just too rare to find a guy that does the right thing, all the time. He completes his cuts. It attacks aggressively but not overbearing. He sets up teammates when he draws the defense. He takes high percentage shots. He changes direction with ease.

I want a guy like that to make the league.


 
Author: NOODLESTYLE 
Posted: 04/17 7:08 AM 
 
Mike@LG wrote:
He plays exactly like a high IQ player that's team oriented. I REALLY like guys like that.

It's just too rare to find a guy that does the right thing, all the time. He completes his cuts. It attacks aggressively but not overbearing. He sets up teammates when he draws the defense. He takes high percentage shots. He changes direction with ease.

I want a guy like that to make the league.


Lakers have 2 2nd round picks. One in the middle and late I think. I'm hoping Lakers take that chance and select him. If he's able to improve his jumper, which I think he will, I can see him developing with the Lakers.


 
Author: Mike@LG 
Posted: 04/17 7:17 AM 
 
NOODLESTYLE wrote:
Mike@LG wrote:
He plays exactly like a high IQ player that's team oriented. I REALLY like guys like that.

It's just too rare to find a guy that does the right thing, all the time. He completes his cuts. It attacks aggressively but not overbearing. He sets up teammates when he draws the defense. He takes high percentage shots. He changes direction with ease.

I want a guy like that to make the league.


Lakers have 2 2nd round picks. One in the middle and late I think. I'm hoping Lakers take that chance and select him. If he's able to improve his jumper, which I think he will, I can see him developing with the Lakers.


I have one guy I like over him, and am hoping he doesn't skyrocket into the 1st round.

2nd rounders who make it in the L, tend to have above average athleticism and 1 or 2 skills that are NBA worthy.


 
Author: NOODLESTYLE 
Posted: 04/17 7:34 AM 
 
Mike@LG wrote:
NOODLESTYLE wrote:
Mike@LG wrote:
He plays exactly like a high IQ player that's team oriented. I REALLY like guys like that.

It's just too rare to find a guy that does the right thing, all the time. He completes his cuts. It attacks aggressively but not overbearing. He sets up teammates when he draws the defense. He takes high percentage shots. He changes direction with ease.

I want a guy like that to make the league.


Lakers have 2 2nd round picks. One in the middle and late I think. I'm hoping Lakers take that chance and select him. If he's able to improve his jumper, which I think he will, I can see him developing with the Lakers.


I have one guy I like over him, and am hoping he doesn't skyrocket into the 1st round.

2nd rounders who make it in the L, tend to have above average athleticism and 1 or 2 skills that are NBA worthy.


Mikhail Torrance? after reading his bio, I too think he would be a great fit for the Lakers. However, at his size and ability to play the PG position that will get the attention of teams especially if he does well at the Draft Combine. I could see teams like the Warriors or Knicks going after him as well.


 
Author: NOODLESTYLE 
Posted: 05/20 7:12 AM 
 
http://insider.espn.go.com/nba/blog?name=nba_draft&id=5200931&action=login&appRedirect=http://insider.espn.go.com/nba/blog%3fname%3dnba_draft%26id%3d5200931

Quote:

ESPN Insider:
Some love for Jeremy Lin
I got some interesting feedback from teams about Harvard's Jeremy Lin. I wrote last week that I didn't think Lin was ready for the NBA and I expected him to go undrafted after a workout I saw in Vegas. However, several teams have since told me that they are considering Lin with their second-round pick.

While they agreed with my assessment that he may struggle athletically, they also think his high basketball IQ and ability to score make him a legitimate prospect.


 
Author: KobeRe-Loaded 
Posted: 05/20 3:44 PM 
 
High BB IQ, savvy passing, and a good stroke will compensate for lack of athletic ability >>>> Steve Nash

Jeremy Lin! DO IT MITCH!!


 
Author: cyclo7 
Posted: 05/20 10:32 PM 
 
All-Star.


 
Author: Mike@LG 
Posted: 05/21 1:32 AM 
 
Wow, once again, taking the few things I say, completely out of proportion and context.

Quote:


He dunks with ease at 6'3", which is hardly a "sub average" vert. The guy has an average vert. at worst. See tomahawk dunk.


Dunking ability is a poor assessment of subaverage vert. Doesn't take into context of wingspan. Hell, think about what "average athleticism" is in the NBA. He's an average athlete for an NCAA player. That's below average at the next level.

Quote:

Why? Because he's asian? Who said asians can't be fast?


As in deceptively quick. Though I'm surprised you took what I said and gave it a racial undertone.


 
Author: DocK36 
Posted: 05/21 5:16 AM 
 
KobeRe-Loaded wrote:
High BB IQ, savvy passing, and a good stroke will compensate for lack of athletic ability >>>> Steve Nash

Jeremy Lin! DO IT MITCH!!


So what, he's like the Asian version of Luke Walton? I know those are only highlights but he looks much more athletic than Sasha, if he can knock down the jumper and not foul people 30 feet away from the basket he'll be an upgrade over the machine.


 
Author: DocK36 
Posted: 05/21 5:20 AM 
 
Mike@LG wrote:
He plays exactly like a high IQ player that's team oriented. I REALLY like guys like that.

It's just too rare to find a guy that does the right thing, all the time. He completes his cuts. It attacks aggressively but not overbearing. He sets up teammates when he draws the defense. He takes high percentage shots. He changes direction with ease.

I want a guy like that to make the league.


Sounds very intriguing, but how is his defense? Will he be a liability or does he have the potential to at least be an average defender against NBA PGs?


 
Author: Mike@LG 
Posted: 05/21 5:28 AM 
 
DocK36 wrote:
Mike@LG wrote:
He plays exactly like a high IQ player that's team oriented. I REALLY like guys like that.

It's just too rare to find a guy that does the right thing, all the time. He completes his cuts. It attacks aggressively but not overbearing. He sets up teammates when he draws the defense. He takes high percentage shots. He changes direction with ease.

I want a guy like that to make the league.


Sounds very intriguing, but how is his defense? Will he be a liability or does he have the potential to at least be an average defender against NBA PGs?


Liable, but heady. The "new" NBA is weird. Less franchise players, but more athletic, talented players. When guys like Dragic, Barbosa, Ty Lawson, Nate Robinson, Jamal Crawford, Darren Collison, CJ Watson, etc., come off the bench, can you even afford a slow player anymore?


 
Author: babyskyhook 
Posted: 05/21 7:54 AM 
 
Mike@LG wrote:
DocK36 wrote:
Mike@LG wrote:
He plays exactly like a high IQ player that's team oriented. I REALLY like guys like that.

It's just too rare to find a guy that does the right thing, all the time. He completes his cuts. It attacks aggressively but not overbearing. He sets up teammates when he draws the defense. He takes high percentage shots. He changes direction with ease.

I want a guy like that to make the league.


Sounds very intriguing, but how is his defense? Will he be a liability or does he have the potential to at least be an average defender against NBA PGs?


Liable, but heady. The "new" NBA is weird. Less franchise players, but more athletic, talented players. When guys like Dragic, Barbosa, Ty Lawson, Nate Robinson, Jamal Crawford, Darren Collison, CJ Watson, etc., come off the bench, can you even afford a slow player anymore?


No.

Need to have at least one guy on the roster w/ the athleticism to keep up with those guys. Someone like Torrance or Randle. I know Randle is small, but he was impressive every time I saw him at Cal. HE can just flat out play, and he's got the speed to stay with the fastest guys in the NBA.


 
Author: PayasoLoco 
Posted: 05/22 6:00 PM 
 
pass sounds like asian luke walton wholl gert destroyed on D


 
Author: NOODLESTYLE 
Posted: 05/23 2:20 AM 
 
He's a better all-around player than Luke Walton.

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