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ryan_c
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 12:26 am    Post subject: Chess Thread

Anybody here play chess(it's cool)?

At novice level , you should focus studying tactics.Because at novice level blunders are the common cause of defeat. Example of blunder is you put your piece where it will be captured, but you can't captured back. As a result you will be piece down. Another common novice blunder is failing to notice you will mated in a few moves. Solving/studying tactics will also make you spot tactics in your game.

You can play here.
https://www.chess.com/

10 Basic checkmate patterns to know.
http://www.usefulchess.com/tactics/checkmate.htm

One of the best online site for playing chess.
http://www.chess.com/

Queen double attack
http://www.chesstactics.org/index.php?Type=page&Action=none&From=2,2,1,1

Bishop double attack
http://www.chesstactics.org/index.php?Type=page&Action=none&From=2,3,1,1

More info about chess tactics
http://www.chesstactics.org/

For those who wants to learn how to play Chess.
http://www.chesscorner.com/tutorial/learn.htm

General Chess Strategies

Good and Bad Bishop
http://www.thechesswebsite.com/good-bad-bishop/

Outpost
http://www.thechesswebsite.com/chess-outposts/

Some Basic Endgame Lessons.

Two Rook Mate
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1aeokFZo9k

Rook and King vs Lone king Mate
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WeMYBXEhCL0

Opposition & Pawn Promotion
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5HBtQ7KHNo


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 1:22 am    Post subject:

Greatest game ever invented.

When 2 good players go head to head, first person to make a mistake loses the game.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 4:06 am    Post subject:

I like playing speed chess. 1800+ rating. 2100 at yahoo chess.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 4:36 am    Post subject:

The key in chess is to set up combinations; moves that "force" your opponent to react to your threat. The combinations themselves are a series of moves that threaten or execute the double attacks, pins, skewers, etc. The use of combinations also aids the chess player to "look ahead" further moves. The chess player with the brains to see and plot more combinations (a tree structure of moves and counter moves rather than a linear sequence) than his opponent should win, unless of course he blunders.

That's where the novice should begin after learning basic attacks.

Later you may wish to learn some chess openings. The objective of the opening is to gain control of the middle of the chess board, which is strategically the most important. You also need to learn openings if you are to ever engage in tournament play, unless you love to be caught unprepared and enjoy watching your precious minutes tick away before you even have a chance to engage in the middle game, which is where most of your time will be burned.

Personally, I hate the game.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 5:04 am    Post subject:

angrypuppy wrote:
The key in chess is to set up combinations; moves that "force" your opponent to react to your threat. The combinations themselves are a series of moves that threaten or execute the double attacks, pins, skewers, etc. The use of combinations also aids the chess player to "look ahead" further moves. The chess player with the brains to see and plot more combinations (a tree structure of moves and counter moves rather than a linear sequence) than his opponent should win, unless of course he blunders.

That's where the novice should begin after learning basic attacks.

Later you may wish to learn some chess openings. The objective of the opening is to gain control of the middle of the chess board, which is strategically the most important. You also need to learn openings if you are to ever engage in tournament play, unless you love to be caught unprepared and enjoy watching your precious minutes tick away before you even have a chance to engage in the middle game, which is where most of your time will be burned.

Personally, I hate the game.


Below 2300 level, players do not really have deep opening knowledge. You can really get away at this level below with out much opening knowledge(provided you are good at endgames, tactics and strategy). In fact I know masters who don't know opening names.

In fact GMs like Nakamura, Short etc always plays opening moves that are out of the book early.

rockyp wrote:
I like playing speed chess. 1800+ rating. 2100 at yahoo chess.


I suggest you try to play at chess.com. It's better to play there.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 5:16 am    Post subject:

I disagree, having played chess competitively. While you needn't know every single opening variation (and there can be scores in each major opening) you should understand and anticipate for the simple reason that it saves your time clock. I've sat in tournaments where the kibitzers proclaim what variation I'm using (sometimes incorrectly) so I question your world view when you get to a moderately high level of play.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 5:35 am    Post subject:

angrypuppy wrote:
I disagree, having played chess competitively. While you needn't know every single opening variation (and there can be scores in each major opening) you should understand and anticipate for the simple reason that it saves your time clock. I've sat in tournaments where the kibitzers proclaim what variation I'm using (sometimes incorrectly) so I question your world view when you get to a moderately high level of play.


I also played chess competitively.What is your rating?Yeah some opening knowledge can save some clock. But as I told, at below 2300,most of the time you can get away without much opening knowledge(provided you done your homework with endgames, tactics and strategy). And I already told that I know masters who don't even know opening names.

If an elite GM like Nakamura can get away playing early out of book moves, below their level players can get away too. Carlsen even beat a strong GM with the dubious Ponziani Opening.

Take a look at the games of International Master Basman. He plays unusual/bizarre openings,and he still wins. If Basman can outplay/beat GMs because of his tactical, strategical and endgame skills then below his level players too can do it against lower level opponents(provided they study endgames, tactics and strategy).

http://www.chessgames.com/player/michael_john_basman.html
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 6:29 am    Post subject:

I'm not familiar with Basman, it has been many years since I played competitively. I received an Expert rating as a kid, and that was a year before I really started playing well... and the year I stopped. The late Isaac Kashdan watched me play a few times (Grandmaster, LA Times chess correspondent) mentioned that I was playing at Master level when he watched me play during one of the Piatigorsky "junior" tourneys for high school kids (note: the rating system may have changed, we didn't have more than GM, Master, Expert, A/B/C back then and yes each had a numeric range of values). I was illegally entered as I was not in high school yet.

There were players back then who used "unorthodox" openings, or transitional openings to throw players off balance. You cannot really prepare for such games, but then you don't encounter that often during tournaments. From experience the better players usually used a couple of dozen well-known openings, and since that constituted 95% of the games you played, you prepared accordingly. The better HS age players knew and utilized at least a few (perhaps most) of the following: Ruy Lopez, Sicilian Defense, French Defense, Queens Gambit, Queens Gambit Declined, Kings Indian Defense, Queens Indian Defense, Kings Gambit, Kings Gambit Declined, Alekhine's Defense and the ever popular (and reputedly dated) Two Knights Game and Guacco Piano (sp?).

Unless the staid world of chess has dramatically changed, ignoring the obviously common openings is a poor way of preparing for tournament play.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 1:19 pm    Post subject:

Learned when I was six, played pretty consistently pretty much through high school, including tournament play. Was USCF rated in the 1900s, although I have no idea if the rating system has remained consistent so ratings back then are comparable.

Strategy back then was to either know an opening cold, or immediately take it out of book to neutralize the opponent's book knowledge. For example, I never played conventionally against the Sicilian, and since I never played it as black, there were vast swaths of the ECO that I got to skip.

Haven't played in years -- decades. I wrote a chess program about 20 years or so ago, and spent some time playing against that, but that's the last time I really spent any time with the game. Other priorities.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 1:26 pm    Post subject:

I should have been a pretty good player. My dad was and still is a great player, played in tournaments, was a chess referee, organized tournaments back in Yugoslavia. He taught me how to play at a young age, I read a bunch of chess books. But I just didn't have the patience and gave up playing in my teens. I've regretted it all these years.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 1:36 pm    Post subject:

angrypuppy wrote:
I'm not familiar with Basman, it has been many years since I played competitively. I received an Expert rating as a kid, and that was a year before I really started playing well... and the year I stopped. The late Isaac Kashdan watched me play a few times (Grandmaster, LA Times chess correspondent) mentioned that I was playing at Master level when he watched me play during one of the Piatigorsky "junior" tourneys for high school kids (note: the rating system may have changed, we didn't have more than GM, Master, Expert, A/B/C back then and yes each had a numeric range of values). I was illegally entered as I was not in high school yet.

There were players back then who used "unorthodox" openings, or transitional openings to throw players off balance. You cannot really prepare for such games, but then you don't encounter that often during tournaments. From experience the better players usually used a couple of dozen well-known openings, and since that constituted 95% of the games you played, you prepared accordingly. The better HS age players knew and utilized at least a few (perhaps most) of the following: Ruy Lopez, Sicilian Defense, French Defense, Queens Gambit, Queens Gambit Declined, Kings Indian Defense, Queens Indian Defense, Kings Gambit, Kings Gambit Declined, Alekhine's Defense and the ever popular (and reputedly dated) Two Knights Game and Guacco Piano (sp?).

Unless the staid world of chess has dramatically changed, ignoring the obviously common openings is a poor way of preparing for tournament play.


I disagree of poor way. Basman beat GMs with unusual openings. So an ordinary player surely can win tournaments too with unusual opening against lesser opponents. Nakamura/Carlsen beats GMs with sidelines.

Actually at below 2300 you can also used well known openings and be successful without great deep opening knowledge. At below 2300 level many players even if they used well known openings, their theoretical knowledge is not deep. At these level you don't need to know 20 or 30 moves deep of opening knowledge. It's common for GM to start with well known opening like Ruy Lopez, but plays the side line of it. Unless the opening has forcing lines, you can do well at below 2300 without deep opening knowledge. Of course, if you will play the poison pawn variation of sicilian najdorf you need to learn many lines. But then many GM does not suggest to below 2300 players the Najdorf as your main defense.

For example if you are black, and you faced the King's Gambit, you don't need to memorize thousand lines. In fact white gains nothing from King's Gambit.

1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3. Nf3 3...d5(modern way of treating the King's Gambit) 4. exd5 5. B5+(the only that test Black)...c6. Black is okay here. You see these opening lines do not take much time to learn.

International Master Grooten let his 2000 and above rated players students take the white side of an opening variation, where white gets a positional advantage ,and he still beats them. After the opening phase, the greater strength of an IM in endgames, calculation, tactics and strategy takes over against his strong opponents. After the opening phase, the quality of play of experts suffer against the IM.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 2:17 pm    Post subject:

ryan_c wrote:
angrypuppy wrote:
I'm not familiar with Basman, it has been many years since I played competitively. I received an Expert rating as a kid, and that was a year before I really started playing well... and the year I stopped. The late Isaac Kashdan watched me play a few times (Grandmaster, LA Times chess correspondent) mentioned that I was playing at Master level when he watched me play during one of the Piatigorsky "junior" tourneys for high school kids (note: the rating system may have changed, we didn't have more than GM, Master, Expert, A/B/C back then and yes each had a numeric range of values). I was illegally entered as I was not in high school yet.

There were players back then who used "unorthodox" openings, or transitional openings to throw players off balance. You cannot really prepare for such games, but then you don't encounter that often during tournaments. From experience the better players usually used a couple of dozen well-known openings, and since that constituted 95% of the games you played, you prepared accordingly. The better HS age players knew and utilized at least a few (perhaps most) of the following: Ruy Lopez, Sicilian Defense, French Defense, Queens Gambit, Queens Gambit Declined, Kings Indian Defense, Queens Indian Defense, Kings Gambit, Kings Gambit Declined, Alekhine's Defense and the ever popular (and reputedly dated) Two Knights Game and Guacco Piano (sp?).

Unless the staid world of chess has dramatically changed, ignoring the obviously common openings is a poor way of preparing for tournament play.


I disagree of poor way. Basman beat GMs with unusual openings. So an ordinary player surely can win tournaments too with unusal opening against lesser opponents. Nakamura/Carlsen beats GMs with sidelines

Actually at below 2300 you can also used well known openings and be successful without great deep opening knowledge. At below 2300 level many players even if they used well known openings, their theoretical knowledge is not deep. At these level you don't need to know 20 or 30 moves deep of opening knowledge. Its common for GM to start with well known opening like Ruy Lopez, but plays the side line of it. Unless the opening has forcing lines, you can do well at below 2300 without deep opening knowledge. Of course if you will play the poison pawn variation of sicilian najdor you need to learn many lines. But then many GM does not suggest to below 2300 players the Najdorf as your main defense.

For example if you are black and you faced the King's Gambit you don't need to memorize thousand lines. In fact white gains nothing from King's Gambit.

1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3. Nf3 3...d5(modern way of treating the King's Gambit) 4. exd5 5. B5+(the only that test Black)...c6. Black is ok here. You see these opening lines do not take much time to learn.

International Master Grooten let his 2000 and above rated players students take the white side of an opening variation where white gets a positional advantage and he still beats them. After the opening phase, the greater strength of an IM in endgames, calculation, tactics and strategy takes over against his strong opponent. After the opening phase the quality of play of experts suffer.



Nonsense. You save time on your time clock by being prepared for the most common openings in chess, and time can become either your ally or adversary during long chess games, particularly problematic middle games. Knowledge of opening can also allow you to use variations that can steer your towards either an advantage or at least nullify an advantage. Sure some Master or GM might select an unorthodox opening, but that doesn't nullify the importance of preparing against the vast majority of your opponents who will use a conventional chess opening... and in all probability neither you nor your opponent will be playing at Basman's level anyway. Sorry, I just find your advice outright weird.

Kings Gambit was popular back in the day, before you pushed your first piece of wood. It waned in popularity after Bobby Fisher penned something along the lines of "The King's Gambit is Dead" long ago, yet old school chess teachers were still promoting it. I never used the opening as white, but I knew how to counter it out as black. If you weren't properly trained and familiar with the opening (thank you Bobby Fisher) you could be placed at a significant positional disadvantage, which is why the King's Gambit was so popular among world champions in the old days.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 4:08 pm    Post subject:

angrypuppy wrote:
ryan_c wrote:
angrypuppy wrote:
I'm not familiar with Basman, it has been many years since I played competitively. I received an Expert rating as a kid, and that was a year before I really started playing well... and the year I stopped. The late Isaac Kashdan watched me play a few times (Grandmaster, LA Times chess correspondent) mentioned that I was playing at Master level when he watched me play during one of the Piatigorsky "junior" tourneys for high school kids (note: the rating system may have changed, we didn't have more than GM, Master, Expert, A/B/C back then and yes each had a numeric range of values). I was illegally entered as I was not in high school yet.

There were players back then who used "unorthodox" openings, or transitional openings to throw players off balance. You cannot really prepare for such games, but then you don't encounter that often during tournaments. From experience the better players usually used a couple of dozen well-known openings, and since that constituted 95% of the games you played, you prepared accordingly. The better HS age players knew and utilized at least a few (perhaps most) of the following: Ruy Lopez, Sicilian Defense, French Defense, Queens Gambit, Queens Gambit Declined, Kings Indian Defense, Queens Indian Defense, Kings Gambit, Kings Gambit Declined, Alekhine's Defense and the ever popular (and reputedly dated) Two Knights Game and Guacco Piano (sp?).

Unless the staid world of chess has dramatically changed, ignoring the obviously common openings is a poor way of preparing for tournament play.


I disagree of poor way. Basman beat GMs with unusual openings. So an ordinary player surely can win tournaments too with unusal opening against lesser opponents. Nakamura/Carlsen beats GMs with sidelines

Actually at below 2300 you can also used well known openings and be successful without great deep opening knowledge. At below 2300 level many players even if they used well known openings, their theoretical knowledge is not deep. At these level you don't need to know 20 or 30 moves deep of opening knowledge. Its common for GM to start with well known opening like Ruy Lopez, but plays the side line of it. Unless the opening has forcing lines, you can do well at below 2300 without deep opening knowledge. Of course if you will play the poison pawn variation of sicilian najdor you need to learn many lines. But then many GM does not suggest to below 2300 players the Najdorf as your main defense.

For example if you are black and you faced the King's Gambit you don't need to memorize thousand lines. In fact white gains nothing from King's Gambit.

1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3. Nf3 3...d5(modern way of treating the King's Gambit) 4. exd5 5. B5+(the only that test Black)...c6. Black is ok here. You see these opening lines do not take much time to learn.

International Master Grooten let his 2000 and above rated players students take the white side of an opening variation where white gets a positional advantage and he still beats them. After the opening phase, the greater strength of an IM in endgames, calculation, tactics and strategy takes over against his strong opponent. After the opening phase the quality of play of experts suffer.



Nonsense. You save time on your time clock by being prepared for the most common openings in chess, and time can become either your ally or adversary during long chess games, particularly problematic middle games. Knowledge of opening can also allow you to use variations that can steer your towards either an advantage or at least nullify an advantage. Sure some Master or GM might select an unorthodox opening, but that doesn't nullify the importance of preparing against the vast majority of your opponents who will use a conventional chess opening... and in all probability neither you nor your opponent will be playing at Basman's level anyway. Sorry, I just find your advice outright weird.

Kings Gambit was popular back in the day, before you pushed your first piece of wood. It waned in popularity after Bobby Fisher penned something along the lines of "The King's Gambit is Dead" long ago, yet old school chess teachers were still promoting it. I never used the opening as white, but I knew how to counter it out as black. If you weren't properly trained and familiar with the opening (thank you Bobby Fisher) you could be placed at a significant positional disadvantage, which is why the King's Gambit was so popular among world champions in the old days.




Nonsense.Player like you will be better served to develop analytical skills, study endgames, strategy and tactics. In fact many International Masters claimed they get their title without deep opening study(that they only began serious opening study once they reached 2500 rating). I am not saying lower level players should not study opening, I am just saying that focus of study should be on other aspects of chess.

There are many openings lines that don't have clear verdict.For example 1. e4 c5 2. c3,the sicilian alipin, is popular among GM. Many lines here don't have a clear verdict. Many lines here are unexplored. The winner here will be decided on who is the better player(not the opening).

King's Gambit is not popular because the black side discovered/learn good lines against it(like the one I showed to you).

If a player has many pattern knowledge, he can move fast and saves time. That is why Grandmasters are very good at blitz, they have many stored pattern knowledge.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 4:36 pm    Post subject:

LarryCoon wrote:
Learned when I was six, played pretty consistently pretty much through high school, including tournament play. Was USCF rated in the 1900s, although I have no idea if the rating system has remained consistent so ratings back then are comparable.

Strategy back then was to either know an opening cold, or immediately take it out of book to neutralize the opponent's book knowledge. For example, I never played conventionally against the Sicilian, and since I never played it as black, there were vast swaths of the ECO that I got to skip.

Haven't played in years -- decades. I wrote a chess program about 20 years or so ago, and spent some time playing against that, but that's the last time I really spent any time with the game. Other priorities.


Openings are like dress as it can be in or out of fashion. Before Ruy Lopez Berlin variation is considered bad, but now it's very popular among elite GMs. Before Sicilian sveshnikov is considered bad, but now many GMs play sveshnikov.

You are a computer programmer?


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 6:10 pm    Post subject:

ryan_c wrote:
angrypuppy wrote:
ryan_c wrote:
angrypuppy wrote:
I'm not familiar with Basman, it has been many years since I played competitively. I received an Expert rating as a kid, and that was a year before I really started playing well... and the year I stopped. The late Isaac Kashdan watched me play a few times (Grandmaster, LA Times chess correspondent) mentioned that I was playing at Master level when he watched me play during one of the Piatigorsky "junior" tourneys for high school kids (note: the rating system may have changed, we didn't have more than GM, Master, Expert, A/B/C back then and yes each had a numeric range of values). I was illegally entered as I was not in high school yet.

There were players back then who used "unorthodox" openings, or transitional openings to throw players off balance. You cannot really prepare for such games, but then you don't encounter that often during tournaments. From experience the better players usually used a couple of dozen well-known openings, and since that constituted 95% of the games you played, you prepared accordingly. The better HS age players knew and utilized at least a few (perhaps most) of the following: Ruy Lopez, Sicilian Defense, French Defense, Queens Gambit, Queens Gambit Declined, Kings Indian Defense, Queens Indian Defense, Kings Gambit, Kings Gambit Declined, Alekhine's Defense and the ever popular (and reputedly dated) Two Knights Game and Guacco Piano (sp?).

Unless the staid world of chess has dramatically changed, ignoring the obviously common openings is a poor way of preparing for tournament play.


I disagree of poor way. Basman beat GMs with unusual openings. So an ordinary player surely can win tournaments too with unusal opening against lesser opponents. Nakamura/Carlsen beats GMs with sidelines

Actually at below 2300 you can also used well known openings and be successful without great deep opening knowledge. At below 2300 level many players even if they used well known openings, their theoretical knowledge is not deep. At these level you don't need to know 20 or 30 moves deep of opening knowledge. Its common for GM to start with well known opening like Ruy Lopez, but plays the side line of it. Unless the opening has forcing lines, you can do well at below 2300 without deep opening knowledge. Of course if you will play the poison pawn variation of sicilian najdor you need to learn many lines. But then many GM does not suggest to below 2300 players the Najdorf as your main defense.

For example if you are black and you faced the King's Gambit you don't need to memorize thousand lines. In fact white gains nothing from King's Gambit.

1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3. Nf3 3...d5(modern way of treating the King's Gambit) 4. exd5 5. B5+(the only that test Black)...c6. Black is ok here. You see these opening lines do not take much time to learn.

International Master Grooten let his 2000 and above rated players students take the white side of an opening variation where white gets a positional advantage and he still beats them. After the opening phase, the greater strength of an IM in endgames, calculation, tactics and strategy takes over against his strong opponent. After the opening phase the quality of play of experts suffer.



Nonsense. You save time on your time clock by being prepared for the most common openings in chess, and time can become either your ally or adversary during long chess games, particularly problematic middle games. Knowledge of opening can also allow you to use variations that can steer your towards either an advantage or at least nullify an advantage. Sure some Master or GM might select an unorthodox opening, but that doesn't nullify the importance of preparing against the vast majority of your opponents who will use a conventional chess opening... and in all probability neither you nor your opponent will be playing at Basman's level anyway. Sorry, I just find your advice outright weird.

Kings Gambit was popular back in the day, before you pushed your first piece of wood. It waned in popularity after Bobby Fisher penned something along the lines of "The King's Gambit is Dead" long ago, yet old school chess teachers were still promoting it. I never used the opening as white, but I knew how to counter it out as black. If you weren't properly trained and familiar with the opening (thank you Bobby Fisher) you could be placed at a significant positional disadvantage, which is why the King's Gambit was so popular among world champions in the old days.




Nonsense.Player like you will be better served to develop analytical skills, study endgames, strategy and tactics. In fact many International Masters claimed they get their title without deep opening study(that they only began serious opening study once they reached 2500 rating) I am not saying lower level players should not study opening, I am just saying that focust of study should be on other aspects of chess.

There are many openings lines that don't have clear verdict.For example 1. e4 c5 2. c3.the sicilian alipin is popular among GM. Many lines here don't have a clear verdict. Many lines here are unexplored. The winner here will be decided on who is the better player(not the opening).

King's Gambit is not popular because the black side discovered/learn good lines against it(like the one I showed to you).

If a player has many pattern knowledge, he can move fast and saves time. That is why Grandmasters are very good at blitz, they have many stored pattern knowledge.



Oh please, most of us who played competitively studied our middle and end games tirelessly via practice, puzzles, books, etc. What you are arguing is that ignorance trumps knowledge.

I didn't bother with your link because I know the genesis of King's Gambit. You don't get it, but I played in the generation that the King's Gambit was phasing out, which is what I posted multiple times.

If it makes you feel better, I'm sure your approach works for you. And yes, I am being diplomatic.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 6:17 pm    Post subject:

LarryCoon wrote:
Learned when I was six, played pretty consistently pretty much through high school, including tournament play. Was USCF rated in the 1900s, although I have no idea if the rating system has remained consistent so ratings back then are comparable.

Strategy back then was to either know an opening cold, or immediately take it out of book to neutralize the opponent's book knowledge. For example, I never played conventionally against the Sicilian, and since I never played it as black, there were vast swaths of the ECO that I got to skip.

Haven't played in years -- decades. I wrote a chess program about 20 years or so ago, and spent some time playing against that, but that's the last time I really spent any time with the game. Other priorities.



Yep, you really had to have a handle on the opening to play competitively and I'm sure you were a handful, Larry. The study was highly time consumptive, and at some point life trumped chess, which is why I ended up quitting. I derived more joy from friendships, chasing girls, and playing sports. Chess became a drag because to play competitively you needed to drop extracurricular activities. Worse, the best chess players didn't go to college as the demands of the game were too great. That wasn't my path. In fact, chess began to feel like a prison sentence.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 6:34 pm    Post subject:

angrypuppy wrote:


Oh please, most of us who played competitively studied our middle and end games tirelessly via practice, puzzles, books, etc. What you are arguing is that ignorance trumps knowledge.

If it makes you feel better, I'm sure your approach works for you. And yes, I am being diplomatic.



You argument could hold a value if there are players who did not reach international master level without deep opening study. But they did reach international master level without deep opening knowledge/study. Not only this approach work for me,this approached worked for many people(they even get IM title). So your argument is void.

Actually what I am telling here,is what most master/im/gm will also tell to low level players(like you).

Your making assumptions with King's Gambit. It is not popular nowadays at higher level because there are good lines develop by black(as simple as that).


Last edited by ryan_c on Fri Jul 07, 2017 1:49 am; edited 2 times in total
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angrypuppy
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 6:38 pm    Post subject:

[quote="ryan_c"][quote="angrypuppy"]
ryan_c wrote:
angrypuppy wrote:


Oh please, most of us who played competitively studied our middle and end games tirelessly via practice, puzzles, books, etc. What you are arguing is that ignorance trumps knowledge.

If it makes you feel better, I'm sure your approach works for you. And yes, I am being diplomatic.



You argument could hold a value if there are players who did not reach international master level without deep opening study. But they did reach international master level without deep opening knowledge/study. So your argument is void.

Your making assumptions with King's Gambit. It is not popular nowadays at higher level because there are good lines develop by black(as simple as that).



Ah, the fallacy of inductive reasoning.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 6:40 pm    Post subject:

ryan_c wrote:
angrypuppy wrote:
The key in chess is to set up combinations; moves that "force" your opponent to react to your threat. The combinations themselves are a series of moves that threaten or execute the double attacks, pins, skewers, etc. The use of combinations also aids the chess player to "look ahead" further moves. The chess player with the brains to see and plot more combinations (a tree structure of moves and counter moves rather than a linear sequence) than his opponent should win, unless of course he blunders.

That's where the novice should begin after learning basic attacks.

Later you may wish to learn some chess openings. The objective of the opening is to gain control of the middle of the chess board, which is strategically the most important. You also need to learn openings if you are to ever engage in tournament play, unless you love to be caught unprepared and enjoy watching your precious minutes tick away before you even have a chance to engage in the middle game, which is where most of your time will be burned.

Personally, I hate the game.


Below 2300 level, players do not really have deep opening knowledge. You can really get away at this level below with out much opening knowledge(provided you are good at endgames, tactics and strategy). In fact I know masters who don't know opening names.

In fact GMs like Nakamura, Short etc always plays opening moves that are out of the book early.

rockyp wrote:
I like playing speed chess. 1800+ rating. 2100 at yahoo chess.


I suggest you try to play at chess.com. It's better to play there.



Chess.com, that is where I'm rated 1800+. I would be 2000+ if I only played as white (i suck at black). I use c4 english opening.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 6:40 pm    Post subject:

angrypuppy wrote:


Ah, the fallacy of inductive reasoning.


Fallacy in your opinion only(a low level player). What I am telling here is what most GM/IM will also tell(you can google it). So you disagree with majority of the masters then?
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 6:48 pm    Post subject:

rockyp wrote:


Chess.com, that is where I'm rated 1800+. I would be 2000+ if I only played as white (i suck at black). I use c4 english opening.


Cool. Is it blitz rating or online rating? What is your black response with 1.e4 or 1.d4?
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 6:52 pm    Post subject:

angrypuppy wrote:



Yep, you really had to have a handle on the opening to play competitively and I'm sure you were a handful, Larry.


Not true at all. To play competitively, you don't need to study great deal/a lot of openings(but elite level is different story).
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 8:48 pm    Post subject:

Wilt wrote:
I should have been a pretty good player. My dad was and still is a great player, played in tournaments, was a chess referee, organized tournaments back in Yugoslavia. He taught me how to play at a young age, I read a bunch of chess books. But I just didn't have the patience and gave up playing in my teens. I've regretted it all these years.


I think you can still join tournaments for fun. There are older people(age 50 and above) who discover/rediscover passion for chess.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 9:46 pm    Post subject:

Thanks for the opening post with all the links. I've been meaning to get into it again. I played as a kid but not that officially. I never studied it so not very deep, though I always felt I could see more than the other kids.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 10:00 pm    Post subject:

If you want to sharpen your game download Chess Titans. I've beaten it at level 7.
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