LGer's book on history of the jump shot -- with Laker material
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spflakers
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 12:51 pm    Post subject: LGer's book on history of the jump shot -- with Laker material

Fellow LG members. My name's Shawn Fury and I'm a longtime member here and I've gotten to know a few of you over the years. Among those who can vouch for my Lakers credentials is our living legend, NPZ. You might also remember me from passionate discussions about Return to Glory, the coaching abilities of John Bach and my input on the 5,748 threads devoted to "Who's better: Magic or Kobe/LeBron/Jordan."

DB has graciously allowed me to post this little plug and I appreciate his help....not to mention the entire LG staff's incredible work over the years. There is NO place I'd rather argue about whether Lamar Odom was as good as Big Game James.

I'm originally from Minnesota but have lived in NYC for nearly 13 years.

I'm also the author of the 2016 book Rise and Fire: The Origins, Science, and Evolution of the Jump Shot--And How It Transformed Basketball Forever. The book turns 1 year old next week, and the paperback version of Rise and Fire will be available on March 21.

The hardcover's available at bookstores and online and you can also preorder the paperback.

http://amzn.to/2ky00W4

http://amzn.to/2kKiYKd

I just wanted to give my fellow LGers a bit of info on the book as I think (not that I'm biased) that anyone who enjoys hoops history will enjoy the book.

I'd also love to open up this thread to any questions you might have about the book. Maybe you've already read it. Maybe you want to follow the lead of a lady in an Indiana bookstore who complained about the lack of Reggie Miller in the book. Or maybe you're a fan of hoops history and want to know more about Kenny Sailors or the other early jump shooters. Maybe you want to know about the history of the 3-pointer. I'm here so fire away. I can also take any questions you might have about publishing or writing. You can also pm me anytime and my email's on my website, which I'll have linked below. (And at the bottom of the post, a trivia question for chance to win a free book).

So....Rise and Fire. The book traces the jump shot's influence on basketball history, from the time of its introduction to the game in the 1930s to today's overwhelming dominance of the 3-pointer. Along the way I analyzed everything from the resistance to the shot to shooter's gyms to the great guards of the 1960s to Indiana legends like Rick Mount to the high-scoring 1970s to the shooting coaches of today. A few tidbits and highlights:

* This being Lakersground, I'll start with the Lakers stuff. In my chapter on the 1960s -- and how a handful of jump shots by guys like Oscar, Sam Jones, Hal Greer and Jerry West altered the decade dominated by Wilt and Russell -- I write extensively about Mr. Clutch. I had the chance to interview West and I was able to focus the discussion on how the jumper specifically changed his career and his beliefs on everything involving the shot. Of all the guys I interviewed in the book, he was one of the most forthcoming and insightful. Probably not surprising.

In the chapter on the 1950s, the decade that saw the jumper finally emerge on the national scene on a widespread basis, I write about Frank Selvy, who, unfortunately, is most remembered for missing the jumper that would have won Game 7 of the 1962 Finals against the hated Celtics. But, did you know about Frank before that shot? No college player had ever averaged 30 points per game in a season. Until Selvy averaged 41.7 in 1954.

A favorite chapter is devoted solely to Bob McAdoo, who I consider a real revolutionary figure, one of the first great big men jump shooters. Imagine 'Doo in today's game, knocking down 15-footers, grabbing a dozen boards, defending the rim. I interviewed Bob and while he still has some bitterness from his exclusion on the NBA's Top 50 players from 1996 (rightfully so, I think) he enjoyed reminiscing about his career. We remember him from his Laker days but the man won three straight scoring titles and an MVP for the Braves in the 1970s. And don't let anyone tell you Bob didn't deserve the 1975 MVP. Favorite stats? Braves played 3 straight nights and Doo went for 43, 32 and 43. After a night off they played again and Bob put up 49.

* There is no inventor of the jump shot. Don't believe any story that says ONE person invented the shot. Instead, a series of players around the country, unaware of each other for the most part, started shooting it in the mid 1930s (there are earlier reports scattered here and there dating to the 1920s). Kenny Sailors died last year and is often called the father of the modern jump shot because his shot looked a bit similar to the current game, but he wasn't the first either. These revolutionaries weren't always appreciated: Their coaches often threatened them with benching for daring to rise off the court. I was fortunate enough to interview Kenny before his passing.

*Speaking of resistance, in the 1950s as the jump shot led to increased scoring in hoops, writers lashed out. The legendary Jimmy Breslin, then a young pup, wrote in 1956, "What's ruining basketball is the jump shot. Nearly all your big scorers have it. It's impossible to stop and the way the modern player can shoot, you wonder how he ever misses. It requires no team effort. Just a guy who can jump and shoot with made-in-a-laboratory accuracy." And you thought hot takes were a 21st century invention.

* I write about a game that hasn't been discussed much on LG. The Iowa girls state title game in 1968! It featured the old 6-on-6 rules and starred Denise Long, the first woman ever drafted by the NBA. That's right. San Francisco Warriors owner Franklin Mieuli took her in the 13th round of the 1969 draft and wanted her as the star attraction in a fledgling professional league he started in California.

* I loved writing about the late-60s through the early 1970s, in a chapter called "No Conscience Required." Pistol Pete, of course, gets covered. But also Austin Carr, Dwight Lamar, and other gunners from that era. As I wrote, it was when the jump shot became truly weaponized and coaches unleashed these shooters on college hoops especially. Stat: Of the 26 highest single-season scoring averages in D1 hoops, 17 came between 1968 and 1978. These guys shot 30 or 40-plus times every night...and were encouraged to do so.

* LA folks of a certain age might remember Raymond Lewis. He's sometimes called the best player to never play in the NBA. A few others get that title occasionally but it's hard to argue with Lewis's credentials for earning that unfortunate crown. A high school legend, he led Verbum Dei to 3 straight titles and then starred at Los Angeles State. He left early for the NBA, got drafted by the Sixers in the first round, lit up Doug Collins in camp, got mad at his contract, left...and never played a minute of pro ball. He died at the age of 48, done in by his demons and drug and alcohol abuse.

* First college game to use the 3-pointer? 1945, guys. Fordham at Columbia. A basketball innovator named Howard Hobson, a legendary coach at Oregon, convinced the teams to use an experimental line in a game in February of 1945. The short-lived ABL used the shot in the early 1960s and then of course the ABA and eventually the NBA. The NY Times wrote after the Columbia game, "It seems safe to predict that the optional plan will be permitted to die a natural death." And so it did. For a spell.

* There's been a lot of amazing talk on LG about shooting fundamentals and jump shot theories. I had the chance to profile several shooting coaches, including the amazing Dave Hopla, who might be more famous for his own absurd shooting than his coaching. Also had the chance to play HORSE against Dave. I won't reveal the victor here but.....you can probably guess.

And all of that's just the tip of the jump shooting iceberg. Like I wrote, if you're a fan of basketball, whether the history or the current game or both, I think you'll like the book.

A few links:
I put together videos of the folks I write about, broken down by chapter:
http://bit.ly/2kqzG5l

An excerpt with the book's Introduction: http://bit.ly/2lPzOIq

Finally, maybe you're thinking, I'm not going to read a book from a guy who never made a jumper in his life. Well, you'll be happy to know I was a good high school player, played JUCO ball and, most importantly, can still knock down the J. Here's me last month in my old man NYC league going Kobe-vs.-the-Sonics-in-2003. Maybe Golden Throat and KeepitRealorElse can critique the form: how about me using the one-two and the hop, fellas?
http://bit.ly/2lRg6LN

And, now, a trivia question, first one with right answer wins a signed book (caveat: I'm overseas for 3 weeks so it'll get sent early March). I'll throw out another question once this one's been answered for a second winner.

Q: Of all the players in Lakers history, who scored the most points in his college career?

Thanks a lot for reading. And again, fire away with any questions or debates or critiques! (One note, I'm currently 10 hours ahead of LA time, so if I sometimes don't reply to something right away, that's only reason).


Last edited by spflakers on Wed Feb 15, 2017 9:38 pm; edited 1 time in total
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44TheLogo
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 1:17 pm    Post subject:

is it andrew goudelock?

also that's a heckuva gooseneck you've got
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 1:39 pm    Post subject:

44TheLogo wrote:
is it andrew goudelock?

also that's a heckuva gooseneck you've got


Tis not. Although, funny enough, when I interviewed Bobby Cremins to talk about Mark Price and Dennis Scott, he started talking about other greats he coached. And...he mentioned Andrew Goudelock. Alas, that did not translate into a legendary Lakers career.
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 1:54 pm    Post subject:

spflakers wrote:
44TheLogo wrote:
is it andrew goudelock?

also that's a heckuva gooseneck you've got


Tis not. Although, funny enough, when I interviewed Bobby Cremins to talk about Mark Price and Dennis Scott, he started talking about other greats he coached. And...he mentioned Andrew Goudelock. Alas, that did not translate into a legendary Lakers career.


damnit! he must be up there at least.
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activeverb
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 1:55 pm    Post subject:

For most colleges points, has to be an older Laker from the days they went to college for four years.

So I'd say: Kareem or maybe Jerry West
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 1:57 pm    Post subject:

activeverb wrote:
For most colleges points, has to be an older Laker from the days they went to college for four years.

So I'd say: Kareem or maybe Jerry West

Didn't those guys technically have to play on the freshman team their first year? Meaning they only played 3 years?
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 2:10 pm    Post subject:

Gotta be Kareem
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 5:33 pm    Post subject: Re: LGer's book on history of the jump shot -- with Laker material

spflakers wrote:
Fellow LG members. My name's Shawn Fury and I'm a longtime member here and I've gotten to know a few of you over the years. Among those who can vouch for my Lakers credentials is our living legend, NPZ. You might also remember me from passionate discussions about Return to Glory, the coaching abilities of John Bach and my input on the 5,748 threads devoted to "Who's better: Magic or Kobe/LeBron/Jordan."

DB has graciously allowed me to post this little plug and I appreciate his help....not to mention the entire LG staff's incredible work over the years. There is NO place I'd rather argue about whether Lamar Odom was as good as Big Game James.

I'm originally from Minnesota but have lived in NYC for nearly 13 years.

I'm also the author of the 2016 book Rise and Fire: The Origins, Science, and Evolution of the Jump Shot--And How It Transformed Basketball Forever. The book turns 1 year old next week, and the paperback version of Rise and Fire will be available on March 21.

The hardcover's available at bookstores and online and you can also preorder the paperback.

http://amzn.to/2ky00W4

http://amzn.to/2kKiYKd

I just wanted to give my fellow LGers a bit of info on the book as I think (not that I'm biased) that anyone who enjoys hoops history will enjoy the book.

I'd also love to open up this thread to any questions you might have about the book. Maybe you've already read it. Maybe you want to follow the lead of a lady in an Indiana bookstore who complained about the lack of Reggie Miller in the book. Or maybe you're a fan of hoops history and want to know more about Kenny Sailors or the other early jump shooters. Maybe you want to know about the history of the 3-pointer. I'm here so fire away. I can also take any questions you might have about publishing or writing. You can also pm me anytime and my email's on my website, which I'll have linked below. (And at the bottom of the post, a trivia question for chance to win a free book).

So....Rise and Fire. The book traces the jump shot's influence on basketball history, from the time of its introduction to the game in the 1930s to today's overwhelming dominance of the 3-pointer. Along the way I analyzed everything from the resistance to the shot to shooter's gyms to the great guards of the 1960s to Indiana legends like Rick Mount to the high-scoring 1970s to the shooting coaches of today. A few tidbits and highlights:

* This being Lakersground, I'll start with the Lakers stuff. In my chapter on the 1960s -- and how a handful of jump shots by guys like Oscar, Sam Jones, Hal Greer and Jerry West altered the decade dominated by Wilt and Russell -- I write extensively about Mr. Clutch. I had the chance to interview West and I was able to focus the discussion on how the jumper specifically changed his career and his beliefs on everything involving the shot. Of all the guys I interviewed in the book, he was one of the most forthcoming and insightful. Probably not surprising.

In the chapter on the 1950s, the decade that saw the jumper finally emerge on the national scene on a widespread basis, I write about Frank Selvy, who, unfortunately, is most remembered for missing the jumper that would have won Game 7 of the 1962 Finals against the hated Celtics. But, did you know about Frank before that shot? No college player had ever averaged 30 points per game in a season. Until Selvy averaged 41.7 in 1954.

A favorite chapter is devoted solely to Bob McAdoo, who I consider a real revolutionary figure, one of the first great big men jump shooters. Imagine 'Doo in today's game, knocking down 15-footers, grabbing a dozen boards, defending the rim. I interviewed Bob and while he still has some bitterness from his exclusion on the NBA's Top 50 players from 1996 (rightfully so, I think) he enjoyed reminiscing about his career. We remember him from his Laker days but the man won three straight scoring titles and an MVP for the Braves in the 1970s. And don't let anyone tell you Bob didn't deserve the 1975 MVP. Favorite stats? Braves played 3 straight nights and Doo went for 43, 32 and 43. After a night off they played again and Bob put up 49.

* There is no inventor of the jump shot. Don't believe any story that says ONE person invented the shot. Instead, a series of players around the country, unaware of each other for the most part, started shooting it in the mid 1930s (there are earlier reports scattered here and there dating to the 1920s). Kenny Sailors died last year and is often called the father of the modern jump shot because his shot looked a bit similar to the current game, but he wasn't the first either. These revolutionaries weren't always appreciated: Their coaches often threatened them with benching for daring to rise off the court. I was fortunate enough to interview Kenny before his passing.

*Speaking of resistance, in the 1950s as the jump shot led to increased scoring in hoops, writers lashed out. The legendary Jimmy Breslin, then a young pup, wrote in 1956, "What's ruining basketball is the jump shot. Nearly all your big scorers have it. It's impossible to stop and the way the modern player can shoot, you wonder how he ever misses. It requires no team effort. Just a guy who can jump and shoot with made-in-a-laboratory accuracy." And you thought hot takes were a 21st century invention.

* I write about a game that hasn't been discussed much on LG. The Iowa girls state title game in 1968! It featured the old 6-on-6 rules and starred Denise Long, the first woman ever drafted by the NBA. That's right. San Francisco Warriors owner Franklin Mieuli took her in the 13th round of the 1969 draft and wanted her as the star attraction in a fledgling professional league he started in California.

* I loved writing about the late-60s through the early 1970s, in a chapter called "No Conscience Required." Pistol Pete, of course, gets covered. But also Austin Carr, Dwight Lamar, and other gunners from that era. As I wrote, it was when the jump shot became truly weaponized and coaches unleashed these shooters on college hoops especially. Stat: Of the 26 highest single-season scoring averages in D1 hoops, 17 came between 1968 and 1978. These guys shot 30 or 40-plus times every night...and were encouraged to do so.

* LA folks of a certain age might remember Raymond Lewis. He's sometimes called the best player to never play in the NBA. A few others get that title occasionally but it's hard to argue with Lewis's credentials for earning that unfortunate crown. A high school legend, he led Verbum Dei to 3 straight titles and then starred at Los Angeles State. He left early for the NBA, got drafted by the Sixers in the first round, lit up Doug Collins in camp, got mad at his contract, left...and never played a minute of pro ball. He died at the age of 48, done in by his demons and drug and alcohol abuse.

* First college game to use the 3-pointer? 1945, guys. Fordham at Columbia. A basketball innovator named Howard Hobson, a legendary coach at Oregon, convinced the teams to use an experimental line in a game in February of 1945. The short-lived ABL used the shot in the early 1960s and then of course the ABA and eventually the NBA. The NY Times wrote after the Columbia game, "It seems safe to predict that the optional plan will be permitted to die a natural death." And so it did. For a spell.

* There's been a lot of amazing talk on LG about shooting fundamentals and jump shot theories. I had the chance to profile several shooting coaches, including the amazing Dave Hopla, who might be more famous for his own absurd shooting than his coaching. Also had the chance to play HORSE against Dave. I won't reveal the victor here but.....you can probably guess.

And all of that's just the tip of the jump shooting iceberg. Like I wrote, if you're a fan of basketball, whether the history or the current game or both, I think you'll like the book.

A few links:
I put together videos of the folks I write about, broken down by chapter:
http://bit.ly/2kqzG5l

An excerpt with the book's Introduction: http://bit.ly/2lPzOIq

Finally, maybe you're thinking, I'm not going to read a book from a guy who never made a jumper in his life. Well, you'll be happy to know I was a good high school player, played JUCO ball and, most importantly, can still knock down the J. Here's me last month in my old man NYC league going Kobe-vs.-the-Sonics-in-2003. Maybe Golden Throat and KeepitRealorElse can critique the form: how about me using the one-two and the hop, fellas?
http://bit.ly/2lRg6LN

And, now, a trivia question, first one with right answer wins a signed book (caveat: I'm overseas for 3 weeks so it'll get sent early March). I'll throw out another question once this one's been answered for a second winner.

Q: Of all the players in Lakers history, which scored the most points in their college career?

Thanks a lot for reading. And again, fire away with any questions or debates or critiques! (One note, I'm currently 10 hours ahead of LA time, so if I sometimes don't reply to something right away, that's only reason).


You have major handles. Too bad they're love handles...
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 9:25 pm    Post subject:

Yeah, Omar, but in this league I'm like Jordan in '87 when it comes to athleticism. (To be fair to my fat upper Manhattan brethren, a couple of the younger guys, most athletic, really good players were not there the night this was filmed).

And also......no one has gotten the trivia question correct yet!
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 11:35 pm    Post subject:

My name's Shawn Fury and I'm a longtime member here and I've gotten to know a few of you over the years. Among those who can vouch for my Lakers credentials is our living legend, NPZ.
--

Sheesh, puh-lease dude. I ain't no GD BOOK level writer. You are indeed the proverbial "man", Shawn (in rarified air with Dladi, Bravo, Huey, CabinCrick and KBCB...THAT echelon...which is like YUGE, okay...). How many of us mofoz on this site can sit down and write a damn BOOK? We're lucky enough whenever a newbie is able to write in complete sentences. I remember you told me you talked to Mark Price for this project, right? If I had to pick one guy who I thought had the embodiment of the stodgy, textbook "elbow-in and perpendicular to rim" and "feet squared to rim" jumpshot, I'd go with Marky Mark. He could assume that form even on a fade or while taking off from one foot. Looked like and seemed as charismatic as a Midwestern insurance salesman, too. I'll bet you had fun trying to make him sound interesting. I'll order one up, bro.
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 2:41 am    Post subject:

Price is one of those guys you wonder how good he'd be in today's game, with the emphasis on point guards, especially ones who can shoot. He was damn tough in his own day, might be even more in the present.

Price's old man, Denny, was a legendary player in Oklahoma and set the state tournament single-game scoring record. Thirty years later Mark tied that record in a state tourney game.

Denny went on to be a longtime coach, including as assistant with the Suns. In 2000, Mark and his brother Brent were back home in Oklahoma and went up to the Y to play ball. Denny went to watch, decided to join his boys in running up and down the court and died of a heart attack right there at the age of 62.

Mark's definitely a quiet guy but on the court....dude was a killer.
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 12:38 pm    Post subject:

It's gotta be a jump shooter based on the book theme: Jason Kapono? Glen Rice?
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 1:31 pm    Post subject:

Good guesses. But...incorrect.
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 8:37 pm    Post subject:

spflakers wrote:
Good guesses. But...incorrect.


It's Elgin Baylor, rite?

This is a tough one intuitively because Sedale scored more in college than West and Alcindor. It's all about # games/years played as well as PPG. PPG got a boost in a number of cases by small schools. Elgin hit all facets (Seattle Univ). Even Dev George scored a lot at Augsburg College, wherever that's at.

I could be wrong on Baylor still, but I'll go with him or research this til it makes me insane, but my initial gut was that it was a small college guy. I was thinking Lindsay Hunter. I remember he was a high scorer type at Jackson St. I found Ron Harper scored more than Kareem, too. Miami of Ohio, 4 years.
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 10:44 pm    Post subject:

"Augsburg College, wherever that's at."

That's Minnesota, baby! MIAC!

And, again, good guesses, NPZ, but incorrect.
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 8:17 am    Post subject:

Little hint that narrows it down a bit:

The Lakers took him in the draft.

So it's a born and bred Laker, not a free agent or anything.
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 10:10 am    Post subject:

mike mcgee?
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 11:54 am    Post subject:

Travis Grant
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 12:18 pm    Post subject:

DancingBarry wrote:
Travis Grant


must be it
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 12:19 pm    Post subject:

DancingBarry wrote:
Travis Grant


Ding-ding-ding-ding-ding-ding-ding-ding!!!!

We have a winner!

Travis "The Machine" Grant. By the time he left NAIA's Kentucky State, Grant had scored 4,045 points, more than any player in college hoops history, even more than Pistol Pete. A few decades later, two players from Lipscomb broke Grant's mark. I devote an entire chapter to the Machine (the nickname given because he was so efficient). In four years, even though he operated primarily on the perimeter, Grant never shot below 60 percent. And the NAIA back then had amazing talent. In a game against George Gervin's team, the Machine put up 68 points.

Kentucky State won three straight NAIA championships. In two of the years, the frontcourt featured three NBA players: Grant, William Graham, and a center familiar to Lakers fans: Elmore Smith. In the NAIA tournament, teams had to win 5 games in a single week. Behind Grant, they went a remarkable 15-0 in three years.

As a kid, Grant's school played on an outdoor court until he was in 8th grade and because his family couldn't afford a basketball, he used a tennis or rubber ball on a five-gallon can.

One year, Grant had a game with 75 on 35 of 50 shooting. Next game? 59.

The Lakers, coming off their 69-win title season, took Grant in the first round in 1972 but it was a tough team for a rookie to break in with. He never did much with them, playing 33 games as a rookie. He had a few good years in the ABA (he played on a team coached by...Wilt), but eventually quit hoops and became an educator. Really fascinating guy in hoops history who's not remembered by a ton of folks.

But is, in fact, the answer to this trivia question.

DB, shoot me a PM for the address of where I can send you a book!

I'll put up another trivia Q here for a second book giveaway.
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 12:49 pm    Post subject:

Travis Grant aka Travis Knight.
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 1:18 pm    Post subject:

non-player zealot wrote:
Travis Grant aka Travis Knight.


Yep. Chicky tripped over that one all the time.
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 1:19 pm    Post subject:

All right, 2nd question, 2nd book. And, unfortunately, NPZ is ineligible on this one because I think I've discussed it with him.

In the should-have-won-an-Oscar 1985 championship video Return to Glory, there is a major continuity/editing error involving Magic Johnson's uniform. In other words, there's a clip that's not right and doesn't fit. What is it and why's it wrong?

(This question is probably impossible, I know. But this movie is near and dear to my heart. But if no one gets it I'll make an easier one. But eagle-eyed Laker fans/sleuths...do your business.)

Video is here if you need:
http://bit.ly/2lWdFZ8
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 5:57 pm    Post subject:

spflakers wrote:
All right, 2nd question, 2nd book. And, unfortunately, NPZ is ineligible on this one because I think I've discussed it with him.

In the should-have-won-an-Oscar 1985 championship video Return to Glory, there is a major continuity/editing error involving Magic Johnson's uniform. In other words, there's a clip that's not right and doesn't fit. What is it and why's it wrong?

(This question is probably impossible, I know. But this movie is near and dear to my heart. But if no one gets it I'll make an easier one. But eagle-eyed Laker fans/sleuths...do your business.)

Video is here if you need:
http://bit.ly/2lWdFZ8


Isn't there a scene with Magic that was actually from the playoffs a year earlier?
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spflakers
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2017 12:28 am    Post subject:

In the same way the 1988 playoff run wasn't the prettiest but was good enough to win the title, so this answer is good enough to win a book.

18:30, as Magic's talking about the Lakers winning the West and the Celtics the East, you see his purple jersey and warmup hanging behind him. But they advanced to the Finals with a home victory over the Nuggets, wearing gold. This was taken from after the 1984 WCF, after the Lakers beat the Suns on the road.

Omar, shoot me your address for the book!
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