Bode Miller's 19-Month-Old Daughter Dies After Swimming Pool Accident

 
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 11:31 pm    Post subject: Bode Miller's 19-Month-Old Daughter Dies After Swimming Pool Accident

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Olympic Skier Bode Miller's 19-Month-Old Daughter Dies After Swimming Pool Accident

Olympic skier Bode Miller and his wife, professional beach volleyball player Morgan Beck, are mourning the death of their 19-month-old daughter, Emeline, after a tragic swimming pool accident over the weekend.

The Orange County Coroner's confirmed the news to ET on Monday, while a spokesperson for Orange County Fire Authority tells ET, "Orange County Fire Authority responded to a 911 call for a drowning on Sunday, June 10.

Paramedics initiated advanced life support care on the patient on the scene, transported the patient to the emergency room and subsequently the patient was pronounced deceased."

The death was under investigation, Orange County sheriff's spokeswoman Carrie Braun said.

Paramedics were called to a home in the upscale enclave of Coto de Caza just before 6:30 p.m. Saturday, said Capt. Tony Bommarito of the Orange County Fire Authority.



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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 1:03 am    Post subject:

RIP to the poor baby... But there is no excuse for this.
My kids are 10 and 13 and I still watch them like a frikkin hawk.
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 1:58 pm    Post subject:

Never under estimate kids’ abilities to get where they’re not supposed to go. Trying to lay blame when none of us knows what happened is a farce. The family is already being punished far beyond anything we could do or say to them. Anybody who thinks they keep their eye on their kid 24/7 is either lying or delusional. We all get distracted from time to time and have to deal with the random crap that can pop up in life. I’m sure the family is playing the woulda coulda shoulda grief game enough to punish themselves already, no need for any outsiders on the Internet who don’t have any idea what happened beyond the tragic result have to pile on.
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 2:13 pm    Post subject:

I read somewhere that it was at a party/ get together at a friend's home. Not an excuse of course but somehow the little one ended up in the pool and no one noticed. I agree, have to watch kids like a hawk but with all the distraction and people I can see how it might happen. Tragic and I am sure the parents are beating themselves up about it. Not sure you ever get over losing a kid.
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 2:52 pm    Post subject:

Sadly, a common factor in young children drowning is that it occurs at a gathering. In such a situation there tends to be an assumption that someone else is aware off the child's whereabouts and it takes only a few moments of such unawareness for tragedy to strike.

Also, drowning for small children isn't the loud frenzy of crying out and splashing that people would imagine - meaning that anyone standing nearby wouldn’t necessarily notice because of the commotion. Much of the time, the child quietly struggles at the surface before slipping silently under. I've seen it occur twice - both with parties of people around. Once with my son at a 4th of July party. A small collection of kids of varying swimming abilities were playing in the water with lots of adults right there. My son, who could dog paddle at the time was playing with his older sister and I was actually watching him swim along. I glanced away to say something to someone and I looked back to him. He was still swimming along, but after a few seconds it became clear that he was trying to swim to the side of the pool but was no longer able to get his face out of the water. He wasn't thrashing and looked totally calm. But it became evident that he was slipping further beneath the surface while not making any forward progress so I leapt in and pulled him up and fortunately I did so before he inhaled any water. He was confused and surprised more than scared (not the same for me).

I watched a similar thing occur a couple of years prior when my daughter was learning to swim at a YMCA. A toddler in another class swam away from a wall while the instructor was helping another kid. The kid who was in trouble seemed to be fine to all outward appearances. It wasn't until the lifeguard leapt out of her chair a threw herself into the water to snatch the kid that I realized what was happening. She knew what to look for, but to the untrained eye it was just a kid dog paddling. It was this incident that helped to realize my son was in trouble in the incident above.

That's not to say that people don't need to be very diligent when their kids are when they are around water. Of course they do. But rushing to judgement and laying blame, while totally understandable, isn't really the appropriate or accurate response. Especially when you don't know the circumstances.

It's a horrible tragedy. That's what people need to focus on and use as a guidance for later.
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 3:03 pm    Post subject:

^^^

Which reminds me that as we move into summer and more and more people will be around pools with kids of all ages and swimming abilities, don't assume you will be able tell immediately when someone - even kids (and others) who can swim - is in trouble in the water. People have drowned right in front of people because they inhaled too much water before someone realized there was a problem. If you see someone in the water, of ANY age, and something (anything at ALL) doesn't look right, take action. Better to make the mistake of being wrong and have a possibly "embarrassing" moment than react too late.
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 5:15 pm    Post subject:

^DMR makes great points above as always.

One more thing I would mention is sometimes in public settings where a lot of people are in the water, the water can get murky due to sunblock wearing off, etc.

Bottom line is pools are very dangerous and any gathering with small children and a pool is worthy of extra caution. I feel horrible for the Miller family, this is just brutal.
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 5:22 pm    Post subject:

Wow this is the worst thing Bode Miller will ever go through, I feel so bad for him
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 10:46 pm    Post subject:

mhan00 wrote:
Never under estimate kids’ abilities to get where they’re not supposed to go. Trying to lay blame when none of us knows what happened is a farce. The family is already being punished far beyond anything we could do or say to them. Anybody who thinks they keep their eye on their kid 24/7 is either lying or delusional. We all get distracted from time to time and have to deal with the random crap that can pop up in life. I’m sure the family is playing the woulda coulda shoulda grief game enough to punish themselves already, no need for any outsiders on the Internet who don’t have any idea what happened beyond the tragic result have to pile on.


cool, so where is it appropriate to discuss freely? This is the Off Topic section. This is the internet. And this is a message board filled w/ anonymous posters. If the only thing we're allowed to say is - "so sad, condolences" - well, that's not really a free discussion.

Not sure why asking how can this happen = piling on. After all, the police are asking the same questions.

If we're not allowed to ask it, I'm sure some people are thinking it.

But if that is in fact offensive to even ponder that question, then I'll ponder about it internally. That would not be offensive to Bode Miller?

I'll leave you w/ this: if Bode Miller was watching your baby and your baby drowned, you'd be asking the same questions and more. You sure wouldn't be as understanding. You wouldn't be saying, "well, it's pretty delusional to think you can watch them 24/7"


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:06 pm    Post subject:

DaMuleRules wrote:
Sadly, a common factor in young children drowning is that it occurs at a gathering. In such a situation there tends to be an assumption that someone else is aware off the child's whereabouts and it takes only a few moments of such unawareness for tragedy to strike.

Also, drowning for small children isn't the loud frenzy of crying out and splashing that people would imagine - meaning that anyone standing nearby wouldn’t necessarily notice because of the commotion. Much of the time, the child quietly struggles at the surface before slipping silently under. I've seen it occur twice - both with parties of people around. Once with my son at a 4th of July party. A small collection of kids of varying swimming abilities were playing in the water with lots of adults right there. My son, who could dog paddle at the time was playing with his older sister and I was actually watching him swim along. I glanced away to say something to someone and I looked back to him. He was still swimming along, but after a few seconds it became clear that he was trying to swim to the side of the pool but was no longer able to get his face out of the water. He wasn't thrashing and looked totally calm. But it became evident that he was slipping further beneath the surface while not making any forward progress so I leapt in and pulled him up and fortunately I did so before he inhaled any water. He was confused and surprised more than scared (not the same for me).

I watched a similar thing occur a couple of years prior when my daughter was learning to swim at a YMCA. A toddler in another class swam away from a wall while the instructor was helping another kid. The kid who was in trouble seemed to be fine to all outward appearances. It wasn't until the lifeguard leapt out of her chair a threw herself into the water to snatch the kid that I realized what was happening. She knew what to look for, but to the untrained eye it was just a kid dog paddling. It was this incident that helped to realize my son was in trouble in the incident above.

That's not to say that people don't need to be very diligent when their kids are when they are around water. Of course they do. But rushing to judgement and laying blame, while totally understandable, isn't really the appropriate or accurate response. Especially when you don't know the circumstances.

It's a horrible tragedy. That's what people need to focus on and use as a guidance for later.


I can't think of one circumstance (outside of a serious medical condition) where a 19 month baby drowns in a pool and no adult is at fault. I can't think of one. You?
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:36 am    Post subject:

I can't even imagine the pain
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 6:26 am    Post subject:

LongBeachPoly wrote:
DaMuleRules wrote:
Sadly, a common factor in young children drowning is that it occurs at a gathering. In such a situation there tends to be an assumption that someone else is aware off the child's whereabouts and it takes only a few moments of such unawareness for tragedy to strike.

Also, drowning for small children isn't the loud frenzy of crying out and splashing that people would imagine - meaning that anyone standing nearby wouldn’t necessarily notice because of the commotion. Much of the time, the child quietly struggles at the surface before slipping silently under. I've seen it occur twice - both with parties of people around. Once with my son at a 4th of July party. A small collection of kids of varying swimming abilities were playing in the water with lots of adults right there. My son, who could dog paddle at the time was playing with his older sister and I was actually watching him swim along. I glanced away to say something to someone and I looked back to him. He was still swimming along, but after a few seconds it became clear that he was trying to swim to the side of the pool but was no longer able to get his face out of the water. He wasn't thrashing and looked totally calm. But it became evident that he was slipping further beneath the surface while not making any forward progress so I leapt in and pulled him up and fortunately I did so before he inhaled any water. He was confused and surprised more than scared (not the same for me).

I watched a similar thing occur a couple of years prior when my daughter was learning to swim at a YMCA. A toddler in another class swam away from a wall while the instructor was helping another kid. The kid who was in trouble seemed to be fine to all outward appearances. It wasn't until the lifeguard leapt out of her chair a threw herself into the water to snatch the kid that I realized what was happening. She knew what to look for, but to the untrained eye it was just a kid dog paddling. It was this incident that helped to realize my son was in trouble in the incident above.

That's not to say that people don't need to be very diligent when their kids are when they are around water. Of course they do. But rushing to judgement and laying blame, while totally understandable, isn't really the appropriate or accurate response. Especially when you don't know the circumstances.

It's a horrible tragedy. That's what people need to focus on and use as a guidance for later.


I can't think of one circumstance (outside of a serious medical condition) where a 19 month baby drowns in a pool and no adult is at fault. I can't think of one. You?


Fault? Tough to say without being there. The point is in an environment where there are a collection of adults, sometimes the whole "whose got their eye on little Joey right now" gets mixed up for a moment.

You ever been at a kid's birthday party and one of them falls and gets hurt? Invariably, at least for a moment or two every adult's attention turns to what is happening. Not saying that's what happened here, but it's just one of many example of things that happen that avert attention of responsible, otherwise diligent adults. And all it takes is a moment sometimes.

If you want to focus on who needs to be blamed, feel free. To some of us that is far from being the issue without something to indicate there was willful neglect.

And to say that everyone is saying that only condolences are allowed and there can be no discussion is obviously incorrect. People such as myself have discussed the issue of drowning and safety. I think what people are saying is "whose fault is it" isn't productive discussion.
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 8:03 am    Post subject:

DaMuleRules wrote:
LongBeachPoly wrote:
DaMuleRules wrote:
Sadly, a common factor in young children drowning is that it occurs at a gathering. In such a situation there tends to be an assumption that someone else is aware off the child's whereabouts and it takes only a few moments of such unawareness for tragedy to strike.

Also, drowning for small children isn't the loud frenzy of crying out and splashing that people would imagine - meaning that anyone standing nearby wouldn’t necessarily notice because of the commotion. Much of the time, the child quietly struggles at the surface before slipping silently under. I've seen it occur twice - both with parties of people around. Once with my son at a 4th of July party. A small collection of kids of varying swimming abilities were playing in the water with lots of adults right there. My son, who could dog paddle at the time was playing with his older sister and I was actually watching him swim along. I glanced away to say something to someone and I looked back to him. He was still swimming along, but after a few seconds it became clear that he was trying to swim to the side of the pool but was no longer able to get his face out of the water. He wasn't thrashing and looked totally calm. But it became evident that he was slipping further beneath the surface while not making any forward progress so I leapt in and pulled him up and fortunately I did so before he inhaled any water. He was confused and surprised more than scared (not the same for me).

I watched a similar thing occur a couple of years prior when my daughter was learning to swim at a YMCA. A toddler in another class swam away from a wall while the instructor was helping another kid. The kid who was in trouble seemed to be fine to all outward appearances. It wasn't until the lifeguard leapt out of her chair a threw herself into the water to snatch the kid that I realized what was happening. She knew what to look for, but to the untrained eye it was just a kid dog paddling. It was this incident that helped to realize my son was in trouble in the incident above.

That's not to say that people don't need to be very diligent when their kids are when they are around water. Of course they do. But rushing to judgement and laying blame, while totally understandable, isn't really the appropriate or accurate response. Especially when you don't know the circumstances.

It's a horrible tragedy. That's what people need to focus on and use as a guidance for later.


I can't think of one circumstance (outside of a serious medical condition) where a 19 month baby drowns in a pool and no adult is at fault. I can't think of one. You?


Fault? Tough to say without being there. The point is in an environment where there are a collection of adults, sometimes the whole "whose got their eye on little Joey right now" gets mixed up for a moment.

You ever been at a kid's birthday party and one of them falls and gets hurt? Invariably, at least for a moment or two every adult's attention turns to what is happening. Not saying that's what happened here, but it's just one of many example of things that happen that avert attention of responsible, otherwise diligent adults. And all it takes is a moment sometimes.

If you want to focus on who needs to be blamed, feel free. To some of us that is far from being the issue without something to indicate there was willful neglect.

And to say that everyone is saying that only condolences are allowed and there can be no discussion is obviously incorrect. People such as myself have discussed the issue of drowning and safety. I think what people are saying is "whose fault is it" isn't productive discussion.


A couple things:

1) Re: fault - it's not my intention to really find fault. It was a response to your claim that "we don't know what the circumstances are" - and my response is, whatever the circumstance was - some adult is at fault. That we know.

2) Re: willful neglect. That's not the only type of fault. There's understandable accidents. However understandable they may be, that's still fault.

3) Re: "It's a horrible tragedy. That's what people need to focus on and use as a guidance for later." - I agree. And this is my way of using it as guidance, however you may disagree. I hear this story way too often. I just don't know how it continues to happen. Pools are probably the no. 1 danger for kids. If we are to use this story as a guidance for later, then we need to ask, how did this happen? But if you're saying - "The point is in an environment where there are a collection of adults, sometimes the whole "whose got their eye on little Joey right now" gets mixed up for a moment." then you're saying it's just going to continue to happen at pool parties and we just have to live with it. Because, this is not the first time, and it won't be the last time. When does the learning begin? Did Bode Miller not learn from previous pool accidents?

And we can focus on Bode Miller, because he lost a baby. Ok. We feel bad for Bode Miller.....

Or, we can focus on the baby, who lost her life. This baby lost her life DaMuleRules. Look at it from the baby's point of view for a moment. This 19 month baby's life was in the hands of adults. This baby will never grow up to go to her prom, never grow up to go to college, to get married, grow old and have kids of her own. This baby lost her life. She only got to live 19 months. If you knew this baby, if this was your baby, wouldn't you be mad? Wouldn't you demand some answers? Maybe I'm just more focused on my condolences for the baby who lost her life, and so I get upset w/ the parents/adults in charge at that pool party.

And I'll give you an example. What if the baby didn't die? What if she fell in the water, was revived but suffered brain damage. Now she's living but she has brain damage. Now what would the reactions be? Condolences? I don't think so. I think there would be more outrage. Why? Because people would be focusing more on the baby and how she has to live her life w/ brain damage. Right now, because she passed away, people are focusing on Bode Miller and how it's a tragedy he lost a baby. It wouldn't be that way if his baby survived but has brain damage.

I know there are dangers that aren't readily apparent to parents. I get that. Sometimes we just can't really foresee things.

But a pool is just screaming DANGER! DANGER! DANGER!

At least it does for me. So whenever I hear of a kid, especially baby drowning, I have the same reaction. Again? Why?

There are parents who won't buy a house w/ a pool if they have kids. Those parents understand the dangers of a pool. There are people w/ pools that put up safety measures, such as a fence. They go to those measures.

If you go to a pool party w/ a 19 month baby - your guards have to be up. That pool is screaming danger. Your baby is depending on you to have your guards up.

So, this is my honest reaction. You might think it's not productive, ok. But it's my honest internal reaction.

Only question is - should I externalize it or keep it internal.

If it's unproductive to externalize it, then it's an unproductive reaction I have internally.

You might think your honest reaction to the situation is the "right" reaction and the more productive reaction. That's your opinion.

I think all reactions, as long as they are honest, are welcome. I want to hear reactions. I want to hear honest reactions. Not everybody reacts the same. Not every reaction is going to be "productive" to everyone.

You think my reaction is unproductive. I say to you, my reaction is honest.

And if I read tomorrow that another 19 month baby drowned in a pool, I will have the same reaction. I'm going to shake my head and think "another baby drowned? Another one? Seriously? Why?????"
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 10:48 am    Post subject:

We all have (and are allowed to have) varying reactions to a tragedy like this. Yes, it sucks for everyone... But I DO want to know WHY and HOW? At parties/gatherings there's the whole "village watching/raising the child" mode we can slip into. But if theres a pool and there are kids around... Securing that shtt to mitigate risk should be a top priority. My kids have had their dair sharw of bumps and bruises... And yes, accidents happen. But damn... Preventable stuff like this hurts to see.
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:04 pm    Post subject:

Quote:
The tragic death of skier Bode Miller’s 19-month-old daughter on Saturday emphasizes the importance of pool safety, especially as the summer season ramps up.

Miller’s daughter, Emeline Grier, wandered into a neighbor’s backyard pool while the family was talking to the neighbors inside their home.

“She was only missing for just a short amount of time and Mom turned and was looking for her and didn’t see her right next to her,” Orange County Fire Authority Captain Steve Concialdi told PEOPLE. “Mom went straight to the backyard to where the pool was. The child was in the pool. The mom pulled out the little girl and they started CPR immediately.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control, children between the ages of 1 and 4 have the highest drowning rates, with most occurring in swimming pools at home. And among the children ages 1 to 4 who die of unintentional injuries, drowning accounts for one-third of the deaths.

...........

Concialdi added that children often do not make a noise if they’re drowning, so parents need to stay vigilant.

“Unfortunately, children do drown without a sound. There is no yelling or screaming,” he said. “When a child jumps in the water and that child doesn’t know how to swim, they panic under water. It is extremely tragic.”


Doesn't sound like a pool party. Probably the neighbor's don't have young kids or kids who aren't able to swim so their pool probably wasn't child proofed.

The adults probably just forgot that there's this 19 month baby walking around who can't swim and there's this big dangerous pool in the backyard. The door was probably left open and the baby just walked right to the pool.

Understandable oversight but an oversight nonetheless.

Pools are dangerous because people forget how dangerous they are. For any child who can't swim, a pool is like a death trap. It'd be like if they were living on a cliff and their backyard lead straight out onto the cliff and there was no railing for safety.

If there was a pitbull in the backyard, the neighbors would probably make sure that dog was locked up first.
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:12 pm    Post subject:

LongBeachPoly wrote:
DaMuleRules wrote:
LongBeachPoly wrote:
DaMuleRules wrote:
Sadly, a common factor in young children drowning is that it occurs at a gathering. In such a situation there tends to be an assumption that someone else is aware off the child's whereabouts and it takes only a few moments of such unawareness for tragedy to strike.

Also, drowning for small children isn't the loud frenzy of crying out and splashing that people would imagine - meaning that anyone standing nearby wouldn’t necessarily notice because of the commotion. Much of the time, the child quietly struggles at the surface before slipping silently under. I've seen it occur twice - both with parties of people around. Once with my son at a 4th of July party. A small collection of kids of varying swimming abilities were playing in the water with lots of adults right there. My son, who could dog paddle at the time was playing with his older sister and I was actually watching him swim along. I glanced away to say something to someone and I looked back to him. He was still swimming along, but after a few seconds it became clear that he was trying to swim to the side of the pool but was no longer able to get his face out of the water. He wasn't thrashing and looked totally calm. But it became evident that he was slipping further beneath the surface while not making any forward progress so I leapt in and pulled him up and fortunately I did so before he inhaled any water. He was confused and surprised more than scared (not the same for me).

I watched a similar thing occur a couple of years prior when my daughter was learning to swim at a YMCA. A toddler in another class swam away from a wall while the instructor was helping another kid. The kid who was in trouble seemed to be fine to all outward appearances. It wasn't until the lifeguard leapt out of her chair a threw herself into the water to snatch the kid that I realized what was happening. She knew what to look for, but to the untrained eye it was just a kid dog paddling. It was this incident that helped to realize my son was in trouble in the incident above.

That's not to say that people don't need to be very diligent when their kids are when they are around water. Of course they do. But rushing to judgement and laying blame, while totally understandable, isn't really the appropriate or accurate response. Especially when you don't know the circumstances.

It's a horrible tragedy. That's what people need to focus on and use as a guidance for later.


I can't think of one circumstance (outside of a serious medical condition) where a 19 month baby drowns in a pool and no adult is at fault. I can't think of one. You?


Fault? Tough to say without being there. The point is in an environment where there are a collection of adults, sometimes the whole "whose got their eye on little Joey right now" gets mixed up for a moment.

You ever been at a kid's birthday party and one of them falls and gets hurt? Invariably, at least for a moment or two every adult's attention turns to what is happening. Not saying that's what happened here, but it's just one of many example of things that happen that avert attention of responsible, otherwise diligent adults. And all it takes is a moment sometimes.

If you want to focus on who needs to be blamed, feel free. To some of us that is far from being the issue without something to indicate there was willful neglect.

And to say that everyone is saying that only condolences are allowed and there can be no discussion is obviously incorrect. People such as myself have discussed the issue of drowning and safety. I think what people are saying is "whose fault is it" isn't productive discussion.


A couple things:

1) Re: fault - it's not my intention to really find fault. It was a response to your claim that "we don't know what the circumstances are" - and my response is, whatever the circumstance was - some adult is at fault. That we know.

2) Re: willful neglect. That's not the only type of fault. There's understandable accidents. However understandable they may be, that's still fault.

3) Re: "It's a horrible tragedy. That's what people need to focus on and use as a guidance for later." - I agree. And this is my way of using it as guidance, however you may disagree. I hear this story way too often. I just don't know how it continues to happen. Pools are probably the no. 1 danger for kids. If we are to use this story as a guidance for later, then we need to ask, how did this happen? But if you're saying - "The point is in an environment where there are a collection of adults, sometimes the whole "whose got their eye on little Joey right now" gets mixed up for a moment." then you're saying it's just going to continue to happen at pool parties and we just have to live with it. Because, this is not the first time, and it won't be the last time. When does the learning begin? Did Bode Miller not learn from previous pool accidents?

And we can focus on Bode Miller, because he lost a baby. Ok. We feel bad for Bode Miller.....

Or, we can focus on the baby, who lost her life. This baby lost her life DaMuleRules. Look at it from the baby's point of view for a moment. This 19 month baby's life was in the hands of adults. This baby will never grow up to go to her prom, never grow up to go to college, to get married, grow old and have kids of her own. This baby lost her life. She only got to live 19 months. If you knew this baby, if this was your baby, wouldn't you be mad? Wouldn't you demand some answers? Maybe I'm just more focused on my condolences for the baby who lost her life, and so I get upset w/ the parents/adults in charge at that pool party.

And I'll give you an example. What if the baby didn't die? What if she fell in the water, was revived but suffered brain damage. Now she's living but she has brain damage. Now what would the reactions be? Condolences? I don't think so. I think there would be more outrage. Why? Because people would be focusing more on the baby and how she has to live her life w/ brain damage. Right now, because she passed away, people are focusing on Bode Miller and how it's a tragedy he lost a baby. It wouldn't be that way if his baby survived but has brain damage.

I know there are dangers that aren't readily apparent to parents. I get that. Sometimes we just can't really foresee things.

But a pool is just screaming DANGER! DANGER! DANGER!

At least it does for me. So whenever I hear of a kid, especially baby drowning, I have the same reaction. Again? Why?

There are parents who won't buy a house w/ a pool if they have kids. Those parents understand the dangers of a pool. There are people w/ pools that put up safety measures, such as a fence. They go to those measures.

If you go to a pool party w/ a 19 month baby - your guards have to be up. That pool is screaming danger. Your baby is depending on you to have your guards up.

So, this is my honest reaction. You might think it's not productive, ok. But it's my honest internal reaction.

Only question is - should I externalize it or keep it internal.

If it's unproductive to externalize it, then it's an unproductive reaction I have internally.

You might think your honest reaction to the situation is the "right" reaction and the more productive reaction. That's your opinion.

I think all reactions, as long as they are honest, are welcome. I want to hear reactions. I want to hear honest reactions. Not everybody reacts the same. Not every reaction is going to be "productive" to everyone.

You think my reaction is unproductive. I say to you, my reaction is honest.

And if I read tomorrow that another 19 month baby drowned in a pool, I will have the same reaction. I'm going to shake my head and think "another baby drowned? Another one? Seriously? Why?????"


Looking at what the possible "causes" were for the tragedy is a logical way to go.

RE: "What happened here and what are things that could be done to prevent it from happening again" is productive.

"Who's fault is it?" gets no one anywhere.
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 5:24 pm    Post subject:

As an aside most infant drownings do not occur in pools but in half filled mop buckets. The 5 gallon paintbucket kind are hard for a baby to tip over if they should call head first into it. Folks with kids should use smaller buckets that can tip over easily for their mopping.
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