advise on bring home a puppy

 
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2021 3:25 pm    Post subject: advise on bring home a puppy

we'd like to adapt a puppy (choices down to Beagle and golden retriever). never had dogs before in our family, don't know where to start. pet store and shelters only have grown up dogs, we want young puppies. is the only way to go about this is to contact local breeders?
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2021 4:06 pm    Post subject: Re: advise on bring home a puppy

SGV-Laker fan wrote:
we'd like to adapt a puppy (choices down to Beagle and golden retriever). never had dogs before in our family, don't know where to start. pet store and shelters only have grown up dogs, we want young puppies. is the only way to go about this is to contact local breeders?


There are numerous organizations out there whom rescue dogs. You can just google dog adoption agencies, dog rescue organizations, etc. I believe there is a website where a lot of them post their dogs and you can apply to adopt the rescues too.

Some things to consider in determining what kind of dog you want -
1. Any allergies? short hair dogs are better
2. Hate cleaning hair? Again, short hair dogs are better.
3. Homebody or like going out - different breeds have more energy. Both Beagles and Golden Retrievers have lots of energy, but Goldens definitely need to be outside a lot.
4. How large is your home? Have a backyard or front yard? Need to make sure there is enough space given the size of the dog
5. children - some dogs nip; dogs with higher energy tend be less children safe (especially when the dog is young)
6. Money - may be worth it to look into genetic medical issues (how often are you going to the vet); what other expenses may be involved (how much money you may spend on food, toys, bedding, bathing, day care, overnight care, etc.)

Those are just some considerations.

In terms of what you do when you get the dog, here are my suggestions -
1. Crate training is a must.
2. Walk your dog on a routine schedule mutiple times per day - make sure he/she pees him/herself out. The more you walk and the more they pee outside, the faster they will be house trained.
3. Train your dog as soon as you can - the more structure you have, the better a pet they will be.
4. Take your dog to dog parks and socialize them with other humans and dogs as much as possible - the more exposure to other dogs and humans they have, the nicer the dog they will be (however, be careful about shots given you don't want your dog to catch something before their vaccinated and certain areas will fine you if you are caught bringing a dog that isn't fixed into a public dog park)
5. Remember that having a dog means that you are more limited in your ability to do things last second - they have to be taken out to go to the bathroom and regularly fed, so it will limit your freedom to some extent.
6. You won't sleep as well for the first year - the dog will wake you up to go pee or howl at night while they are being crate trained
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2021 4:10 pm    Post subject:

No pittbulls.
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2021 4:35 pm    Post subject: Re: advise on bring home a puppy

LakerSanity wrote:
SGV-Laker fan wrote:
we'd like to adapt a puppy (choices down to Beagle and golden retriever). never had dogs before in our family, don't know where to start. pet store and shelters only have grown up dogs, we want young puppies. is the only way to go about this is to contact local breeders?


There are numerous organizations out there whom rescue dogs. You can just google dog adoption agencies, dog rescue organizations, etc. I believe there is a website where a lot of them post their dogs and you can apply to adopt the rescues too.

Some things to consider in determining what kind of dog you want -
1. Any allergies? short hair dogs are better
2. Hate cleaning hair? Again, short hair dogs are better.
3. Homebody or like going out - different breeds have more energy. Both Beagles and Golden Retrievers have lots of energy, but Goldens definitely need to be outside a lot.
4. How large is your home? Have a backyard or front yard? Need to make sure there is enough space given the size of the dog
5. children - some dogs nip; dogs with higher energy tend be less children safe (especially when the dog is young)
6. Money - may be worth it to look into genetic medical issues (how often are you going to the vet); what other expenses may be involved (how much money you may spend on food, toys, bedding, bathing, day care, overnight care, etc.)

Those are just some considerations.

In terms of what you do when you get the dog, here are my suggestions -
1. Crate training is a must.
2. Walk your dog on a routine schedule mutiple times per day - make sure he/she pees him/herself out. The more you walk and the more they pee outside, the faster they will be house trained.
3. Train your dog as soon as you can - the more structure you have, the better a pet they will be.
4. Take your dog to dog parks and socialize them with other humans and dogs as much as possible - the more exposure to other dogs and humans they have, the nicer the dog they will be (however, be careful about shots given you don't want your dog to catch something before their vaccinated and certain areas will fine you if you are caught bringing a dog that isn't fixed into a public dog park)
5. Remember that having a dog means that you are more limited in your ability to do things last second - they have to be taken out to go to the bathroom and regularly fed, so it will limit your freedom to some extent.
6. You won't sleep as well for the first year - the dog will wake you up to go pee or howl at night while they are being crate trained


Great post LS...should be required reading for anyone who is thinking about adopting one of these amazing animals. I love dogs, but due to my work schedule and lack of people around the house during the day, I do not own one as I know it wouldn't be fair to the dog.

I love visiting with other people's dogs though, they can tell how much I love them but then I leave before the work starts!
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2021 4:58 pm    Post subject:

Getting a young one is going to be tough, especially if you want a pure bred. I've been scouring the internet for a youngish Golden Retriever or an English Bulldog. They're out there. Just have to be patient in finding the right one. My last two English Bullies were purchased from an AKC breeder. Back then (2005ish) I wasn't familiar with adopting and was dead set on an AKC dog. Paid out the nose and it was worth it but going forward, it's going to be a rescue dog for me.

https://www.petfinder.com/

There should be local adoption places as well. Wags is one that's 1 minute from my house.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2021 6:28 am    Post subject:

non-player zealot wrote:
No pittbulls.


Pitbulls, despite their reputation, are very sweet and loyal dogs. Unfortunately it's the way some people treat them that makes them dangerous. I have a pit/boxer mix I adopted as a puppy and he wouldn't hurt a fly.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2021 6:51 am    Post subject:

Also keep in mind that some home owners insurance policies will increase their rates depending on the type of dog you have.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2021 7:30 am    Post subject:

There are some breeds that are better for first time owners than others - but there are many great breed descriptions out there.

Other than that, make sure you socialize your dog and keep it mentally busy, not just physically.Train for things like tick removal, cutting nails, checking teeth... right from the start, it is a pain in the butt to have grown dogs that don't like to be checked by a vet, or just cut nails...
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2021 8:07 am    Post subject: Re: advise on bring home a puppy

LakerSanity wrote:
SGV-Laker fan wrote:
we'd like to adapt a puppy (choices down to Beagle and golden retriever). never had dogs before in our family, don't know where to start. pet store and shelters only have grown up dogs, we want young puppies. is the only way to go about this is to contact local breeders?


There are numerous organizations out there whom rescue dogs. You can just google dog adoption agencies, dog rescue organizations, etc. I believe there is a website where a lot of them post their dogs and you can apply to adopt the rescues too.

Some things to consider in determining what kind of dog you want -
1. Any allergies? short hair dogs are better
2. Hate cleaning hair? Again, short hair dogs are better.
3. Homebody or like going out - different breeds have more energy. Both Beagles and Golden Retrievers have lots of energy, but Goldens definitely need to be outside a lot.
4. How large is your home? Have a backyard or front yard? Need to make sure there is enough space given the size of the dog
5. children - some dogs nip; dogs with higher energy tend be less children safe (especially when the dog is young)
6. Money - may be worth it to look into genetic medical issues (how often are you going to the vet); what other expenses may be involved (how much money you may spend on food, toys, bedding, bathing, day care, overnight care, etc.)

Those are just some considerations.

In terms of what you do when you get the dog, here are my suggestions -
1. Crate training is a must.
2. Walk your dog on a routine schedule mutiple times per day - make sure he/she pees him/herself out. The more you walk and the more they pee outside, the faster they will be house trained.
3. Train your dog as soon as you can - the more structure you have, the better a pet they will be.
4. Take your dog to dog parks and socialize them with other humans and dogs as much as possible - the more exposure to other dogs and humans they have, the nicer the dog they will be (however, be careful about shots given you don't want your dog to catch something before their vaccinated and certain areas will fine you if you are caught bringing a dog that isn't fixed into a public dog park)
5. Remember that having a dog means that you are more limited in your ability to do things last second - they have to be taken out to go to the bathroom and regularly fed, so it will limit your freedom to some extent.
6. You won't sleep as well for the first year - the dog will wake you up to go pee or howl at night while they are being crate trained


thanks for the thorough break down and tips
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2021 8:29 am    Post subject:

jonnybravo wrote:
Getting a young one is going to be tough, especially if you want a pure bred. I've been scouring the internet for a youngish Golden Retriever or an English Bulldog. They're out there. Just have to be patient in finding the right one. My last two English Bullies were purchased from an AKC breeder. Back then (2005ish) I wasn't familiar with adopting and was dead set on an AKC dog. Paid out the nose and it was worth it but going forward, it's going to be a rescue dog for me.

https://www.petfinder.com/

There should be local adoption places as well. Wags is one that's 1 minute from my house.


just checked out petfinders.com, how reputable is that site?
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2021 8:31 am    Post subject:

Of the breeds you mentioned, golden retrievers are typically more gentle and docile. Beagles are loud and love to bark. Great for hunting rabbits but can be a problem in an apartment setting. It’s just my preference but the retriever would be my choice.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2021 6:32 pm    Post subject:

Beagles are cute. I have one on my street and he has the most annoying bark ever. Although it really weird he only barks at me when I am leaving my street not when I am entering it.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2021 6:57 pm    Post subject:

SGV-Laker fan wrote:
jonnybravo wrote:
Getting a young one is going to be tough, especially if you want a pure bred. I've been scouring the internet for a youngish Golden Retriever or an English Bulldog. They're out there. Just have to be patient in finding the right one. My last two English Bullies were purchased from an AKC breeder. Back then (2005ish) I wasn't familiar with adopting and was dead set on an AKC dog. Paid out the nose and it was worth it but going forward, it's going to be a rescue dog for me.

https://www.petfinder.com/

There should be local adoption places as well. Wags is one that's 1 minute from my house.


just checked out petfinders.com, how reputable is that site?


Wags that I mentioned posts ads on there and they're legit as far as I know. I might drop by there in the next week and ask about the adoption process. I'll keep you posted.
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Last edited by jonnybravo on Wed Sep 29, 2021 7:28 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2021 7:26 pm    Post subject:

venturalakersfan wrote:
Of the breeds you mentioned, golden retrievers are typically more gentle and docile. Beagles are loud and love to bark. Great for hunting rabbits but can be a problem in an apartment setting. It’s just my preference but the retriever would be my choice.


I want a golden retriever in the worse way. I have a few regulars that bring their goldens to my business and they're soooooo damn smart and well behaved. Love the breed.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2021 7:43 pm    Post subject: Re: advise on bring home a puppy

LakerSanity wrote:
SGV-Laker fan wrote:
we'd like to adapt a puppy (choices down to Beagle and golden retriever). never had dogs before in our family, don't know where to start. pet store and shelters only have grown up dogs, we want young puppies. is the only way to go about this is to contact local breeders?


There are numerous organizations out there whom rescue dogs. You can just google dog adoption agencies, dog rescue organizations, etc. I believe there is a website where a lot of them post their dogs and you can apply to adopt the rescues too.

Some things to consider in determining what kind of dog you want -
1. Any allergies? short hair dogs are better
2. Hate cleaning hair? Again, short hair dogs are better.
3. Homebody or like going out - different breeds have more energy. Both Beagles and Golden Retrievers have lots of energy, but Goldens definitely need to be outside a lot.
4. How large is your home? Have a backyard or front yard? Need to make sure there is enough space given the size of the dog
5. children - some dogs nip; dogs with higher energy tend be less children safe (especially when the dog is young)
6. Money - may be worth it to look into genetic medical issues (how often are you going to the vet); what other expenses may be involved (how much money you may spend on food, toys, bedding, bathing, day care, overnight care, etc.)

Those are just some considerations.

In terms of what you do when you get the dog, here are my suggestions -
1. Crate training is a must.
2. Walk your dog on a routine schedule mutiple times per day - make sure he/she pees him/herself out. The more you walk and the more they pee outside, the faster they will be house trained.
3. Train your dog as soon as you can - the more structure you have, the better a pet they will be.
4. Take your dog to dog parks and socialize them with other humans and dogs as much as possible - the more exposure to other dogs and humans they have, the nicer the dog they will be (however, be careful about shots given you don't want your dog to catch something before their vaccinated and certain areas will fine you if you are caught bringing a dog that isn't fixed into a public dog park)
5. Remember that having a dog means that you are more limited in your ability to do things last second - they have to be taken out to go to the bathroom and regularly fed, so it will limit your freedom to some extent.
6. You won't sleep as well for the first year - the dog will wake you up to go pee or howl at night while they are being crate trained


This post should win some type of award. It is excellent in every way....and gets to the points. Dogs are worth the trouble for most people/families....but they definitely are a voluntary burden you will be introducing to you life. A few things I would add is....

- You can take a look at the private rescue facilities, but I know locally they are not always the easiest routes. First, the best ones are a little intrusive in that they will do background checks, home visits, call references, etc. etc. Also, if you are looking for a very specific dog....especially a puppy, they will usually have waiting lists. They will post one on their website, but there are 20 people on the list ahead of you sometimes.

- I converted to little dogs about a decade ago. They are just easy to grab and go....plus their accidents are far less stinky! That said, if you have young kids and a nice yard....breeds like Labs, Retrievers, etc. are perfect. When my 20 year old daughter was 1ish year old, we got a black lab puppy and he was perfect. He was her buddy....she could pull on his tail....grab his ears...dress him up, etc., and he just knew that she was a kid and never once responded. He viewed himself as her personal bodyguard to a degree.

- I was always a pure breed guy. As a kid, I grew up with muts, and once I had adult money....I had to have pure breeds. Now, I would say not to worry too much about that stuff. It is important to know the main breeds of the mix....or even the parents if possible to have an idea about the dogs likely temperament and size once an adult.....but muts are often the most happy and healthiest dogs.

- If you get a puppy....have tons of patience. Always remember that a pups goal every day when the wake up is to have fun and make you happy.....they will get in trouble and need to be corrected, but it is never with the purpose of upsetting anyone.

- Last thing....well known breeders are always a good option. Be careful with anything online like craigslist....many of the adds are scams. There are often "Facebook" groups in your area of specific types of breeders or just dogs looking for a good home.

Get a dog....be very good to your dog....and you will not regret it on a net basis....although you might a little that first night in a crate!
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 30, 2021 9:31 am    Post subject:

Piss him off. Make your puppy angry.
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 30, 2021 1:54 pm    Post subject:

We have a 10 pound Havanese. She's a good dog. Probably the runt of the litter, but she has been good, even as we've moved multiple times in her short 5 year life span.

We had to go full-bred because my two daughters are allergic to everything. Hair vs. fur is a big consideration if you have allergies in your family.

I'd like a bigger dog but in fairness, I tend to work long hours so the poor dog probably wouldn't get a lot of run with my wife and two daughters. I have to be content with my friends' bigger dogs.

PS - Interesting tidbit about Havanese: Fidel Castro tried to completely obliterate the breed because he viewed them as the dog of aristocracy. The breed survived because Cubans feeling Castro's Cuba kept their dogs and bred them to revive the numbers.
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 30, 2021 4:50 pm    Post subject:

Heartburn wrote:
We have a 10 pound Havanese. She's a good dog. Probably the runt of the litter, but she has been good, even as we've moved multiple times in her short 5 year life span.

We had to go full-bred because my two daughters are allergic to everything. Hair vs. fur is a big consideration if you have allergies in your family.

I'd like a bigger dog but in fairness, I tend to work long hours so the poor dog probably wouldn't get a lot of run with my wife and two daughters. I have to be content with my friends' bigger dogs.

PS - Interesting tidbit about Havanese: Fidel Castro tried to completely obliterate the breed because he viewed them as the dog of aristocracy. The breed survived because Cubans feeling Castro's Cuba kept their dogs and bred them to revive the numbers.


Another important point that I did not learn until later in life.....dogs that do not shed are so much easier to deal with if you are a Type A personality. My last two dogs do not shed, and I really enjoy not having to get the vacuum out almost every day. I recall my lab shed pretty bad....and really bad a couple times a year. I would brush him and he would still shed like crazy. One time he was laying on the bedroom carpet and got up and there was a dog hair imprint of him on the carpet. I went through two Dyson vacuums during his life trying to keep the dog hair off the floor.
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 04, 2021 11:07 am    Post subject:

angrypuppy wrote:
Piss him off. Make your puppy angry.




I got a shih-tzu around age 28. I made that dog tough and even more fierce than the little lion it was already. I would put the dog toy in my mouth and get on the floor and wrestle with her just like I was a giant dog... she bit my nose twice.. poor thing

She had such an attitude when I would take her to the dog park... only 10-12" high.. the other dogs would sniff her in a circled crowd and she would just keep walking until she had enough and Piranha Face a big one in front of her and push it back about 6 feet or more... I would blush with embarrassment because her balls were bigger than mine

One time on our walk we were passing a 7 foot slatted board fence. Two dogs were behind it barking at her... We were almost past and this (bleep) pulls a U-Turn and goes back to their gate and pisses on the gate.. she hikes her leg to pee.. she knew which part of the fence was the gate or it just had more of their pee on it than other parts..

"Man's best friend" treat it like one and you'll have a winner!
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 06, 2021 7:56 am    Post subject:

Im not a dog expert but I do have experience with just one Golden Retriever who is very friendly but also EXTREMELY high energy where walks did little to calm him down.
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 6:10 am    Post subject:

Beagles can be barky
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 5:57 pm    Post subject:

There are some jindo puppies available for adoption on here:

https://www.dove-project.org/
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 6:49 pm    Post subject:

Halflife wrote:
Beagles can be barky
and they are really lousy at mauling babies.
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 9:31 pm    Post subject:

ElginBaylor wrote:
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No pittbulls.


Pitbulls, despite their reputation, are very sweet and loyal dogs. Unfortunately it's the way some people treat them that makes them dangerous. I have a pit/boxer mix I adopted as a puppy and he wouldn't hurt a fly.


A lot of breeds such as the American Bully have had their aggression bred out of them, but most Pitbull breeds, in the hands of a bad owner, can be extremely dangerous and the statistics of dog attacks in America prove it.

Of course, in the hands of a responsible owner, any pitbull breed can be a fine pet, but that's a huge gamble, and we are literally rolling the dice with this breed.
What requirements are there to own a pitbull? Nothing. There are no restrictions, which means that logically you're going to have lots and lots of dog attacks by pitbulls. They end up constituting the majority of the attacks.

The argument for pro-pitbull ownership with 0 restrictions is akin to advocating for knives to be left around the house with small children. Yes, technically with the right supervision, guidance, etc. you are completely safe, but the downside is really, really bad.

That's not to say other breeds AREN'T aggressive. There are plenty of aggressive dogs, but we are talking about the average/mean for breeds, and the statistics are very, very clear. These dogs were bred for attacking/fighting and only until recently have some of these breeds been adapted to remove aggression.
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