Moneybags Lacob whines about luxury tax
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 3:23 pm    Post subject: Moneybags Lacob whines about luxury tax

https://www.espn.com/nba/story/_/id/34273712/sources-nba-fines-warriors-owner-joe-lacob-500000-decrying-unfair-nba-luxury-tax

Quote:
The NBA fined Golden State Warriors owner Joe Lacob $500,000 for violating the league's policy on publicly discussing collective bargaining talks, which included Lacob describing the luxury tax system as "very unfair" on a recent podcast, sources told ESPN on Wednesday.

The comments, aired on the Point Forward Podcast hosted by Andre Iguodala and Evan Turner, included Lacob defending the Warriors' championship roster and league-leading payroll and luxury tax bills that exceed $340 million in the franchise's championship season of 2021-22.


"The hardest thing of all is navigating this luxury tax, unfortunately," he said. "I went back to New York this week for labor meetings. I'm on the committee. And you know, obviously, the league wants everyone to have a chance and right now, there's a certain element out there that believes we 'checkbook win. ...' We won because we have the most salaries on our team.

<snip>

Obviously, it's self-serving for me to say this, but I think it's a very unfair system because our team is built by ... all top eight players are all drafted by this team."


He forgot about Wiggins' $33 million . . .

I put this in the Lounge because of the frequent accusations of the Lakers being "cheap" by not wanting to pay the luxury tax.

NO owner wants to pay it - including the owner of the top revenue generator - and it will be interesting to see what happens in the CBA negotiations. Even if the TV contract trebles, salaries will rise concomitantly unless there is a big change in the CBA, as the players' percentage is locked in by rule.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 3:30 pm    Post subject:

Alex Caruso

(sorry, someone had to do it.)
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 3:42 pm    Post subject:

Teams that build primarily through the draft shouldn't pay more than the teams that just bring in big name Free Agents at a high price.

If the whole point of "small market" and "building the right way" is the NBA wanting teams to do it through the draft as opposed to teaming up and forming Super Teams with a bunch of Max Players.. then the teams that do it the "right way" shouldn't be financially punished as much as the teams that do it the "wrong way" The NBA doesn't want. Otherwise, what's the incentive if everyone essentially winds up paying the same thing. You wind up punishing teams for drafting/developing a bunch of max level players to the point you want them to be forced to get rid of some.

Also to those going "Yeah but Wiggins!" Wiggins was traded off his rookie contract extension, he wasn't signed in Free Agency. So his contract basically exists currently as if the Warriors had drafted and maxed him.


But think of it this way... let's assume the Lakers wound up in the lottery.. and wound up drafting 5 Max level players. The way things currently stand with how they'd be punished in the tax, it would essentially be trying to force them to HAVE to trade some of those players. Why? Why punish the team for "doing the right thing"? In one breath the NBA says "We don't want super teams forming" but in the next breath they say "But if you draft REALLY REALLY WELL... eventually you're gonna have to get rid of them or pay just as much as the teams we don't want doing things the "wrong" way."

So yeah, it is unfair in that regard. The teams that got their talents through the draft should pay less than the teams that build through making max free agent signings.

If the Philadelphia 76ers drafted

2013: Giannis Antetokounmpo
2014: Joel Embiid
2015: Kristaps Porzingis
2016: Ben Simmons
2017: Jayson Tatum

And created a lineup of

PG: Ben Simmons
SG: Jayson Tatum
SF: Giannis Antetokounmpo
PF: Kristaps Porzingis
C: Joel Embiid

Then basically, rather than being rewarded for drafting well and reaping the benefits of that for those players careers. They would essentially get to about the 4 year mark and start having to decide who to keep and who to get rid of, because the tax would get tremendously so high it would near force them to have to make a decision such as that. So really.. even if you draft perfectly, you rarely have the chance to actually see these things pan out and benefit from it, because of the way things are structured.

Teams that get the big free agency coups can see immediate success and have to pay the tax later, you however can build through the draft and will wind up paying just as much, and at times not even have the chance to reap all the benefits of the people you drafted if they all start panning out. Often times you see players that get let go of, have their breakout seasons very soon thereafter (OKC Thunder for example).

So the question becomes.. what can be done about it?
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 3:59 pm    Post subject:

Wiggins is in the KD slot that became D'Angelo, so it was a max FA signing.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 4:04 pm    Post subject:

LakersRGolden wrote:
Wiggins is in the KD slot that became D'Angelo, so it was a max FA signing.


It was a sign and trade for D'Angelo,(for KD) and then they went and got Wiggins and his extended rookie max contract after.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 4:16 pm    Post subject:

MJST wrote:
So the question becomes.. what can be done about it?


Nothing that doesn't cause a bunch of other unfair problems. Being rewarded for drafting well will create strategies around, for example, tanking. Especially if the benefits could be a 10 year dynasty. It also potentially promotes a more uneven competition with no way to even the playing field once dynasties are established which promotes boring competition and potentially less money. Which people have their own problems with.

I'd rather going more toward the NFL way, a hard cap, so different teams win every year. Not really interested in home town identities, more about the competition on the court.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 4:17 pm    Post subject:

MJST wrote:
Teams that build primarily through the draft shouldn't pay more than the teams that just bring in big name Free Agents at a high price.

If the whole point of "small market" and "building the right way" is the NBA wanting teams to do it through the draft as opposed to teaming up and forming Super Teams with a bunch of Max Players.

So the question becomes.. what can be done about it?



I don't see the players union going along with a plan that heavily taxes free agency and restricts players movement. That would be battle royale in CBA negotiations.

Your idea also brings up the issue of trades. Would players who are acquired via trade be taxed like free agents?

If not, that raises the question of why trades are "the right way" but free agency isn't.

The only answer to that question, really, is "the right way" is things that gives teams power at the expense of players -- again, another battle royale.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 4:21 pm    Post subject:

MJST wrote:
Teams that build primarily through the draft shouldn't pay more than the teams that just bring in big name Free Agents at a high price.


That's not the point of the luxury tax system. The system doesn't reward or punish any particular form of team building. It's a compromise alternative to a hard cap. If the NBA had a hard cap, everything would be simpler. So far, the union has refused to agree to a hard cap.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 4:25 pm    Post subject:

drae wrote:


I'd rather going more toward the NFL way, a hard cap, so different teams win every year. Not really interested in home town identities, more about the competition on the court.


Of late, different teams have been winning every year. The last four champs were Golden State, Toronto, Milwaukee and the Lakers.

The last four finals losers were Boston, Phoenix, Golden State, and Cleveland.

In addition, the hard cap idea brings up a significant issue: Since teams would not have the ability to go over cap to resign their own free agents, teams have no advantage in retaining their current players.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 4:29 pm    Post subject:

MJST wrote:
Teams that build primarily through the draft shouldn't pay more than the teams that just bring in big name Free Agents at a high price.

If the whole point of "small market" and "building the right way" is the NBA wanting teams to do it through the draft as opposed to teaming up and forming Super Teams with a bunch of Max Players.. then the teams that0 do it the "right way" shouldn't be financially punished as much as the teams that do it the "wrong way" The NBA doesn't want.


That's not the point, at all.

The point is that, technically, the NBA is an equal partnership of 32 owners. In that partnership, however, revenue is not shared equally. Markets like OKC (44th), San Antonio (31st), Memphis (51st), etc., are at a financial disadvantage compared to New York (1st), LA (2nd), San Francisco (6th) and cannot ever generate the same revenue.

You might say "tough beans - they should work harder/smarter," but the big market teams need them, too. A - they have to have someone to play, and B - the more teams, the bigger the pile of revenue.

The smaller market teams that have changed hands have HUGE mortgages and expenses - without revenue sharing and luxury tax payments, some of them wouldn't turn a profit - and every partner in a megabillion dollar industry should be able to make some money.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 4:35 pm    Post subject:

Dr. Laker wrote:
MJST wrote:
Teams that build primarily through the draft shouldn't pay more than the teams that just bring in big name Free Agents at a high price.

If the whole point of "small market" and "building the right way" is the NBA wanting teams to do it through the draft as opposed to teaming up and forming Super Teams with a bunch of Max Players.. then the teams that0 do it the "right way" shouldn't be financially punished as much as the teams that do it the "wrong way" The NBA doesn't want.


That's not the point, at all.

The point is that, technically, the NBA is an equal partnership of 32 owners. In that partnership, however, revenue is not shared equally. Markets like OKC (44th), San Antonio (31st), Memphis (51st), etc., are at a financial disadvantage compared to New York (1st), LA (2nd), San Francisco (6th) and cannot ever generate the same revenue.

You might say "tough beans - they should work harder/smarter," but the big market teams need them, too. A - they have to have someone to play, and B - the more teams, the bigger the pile of revenue.

The smaller market teams that have changed hands have HUGE mortgages and expenses - without revenue sharing and luxury tax payments, some of them wouldn't turn a profit - and every partner in a megabillion dollar industry should be able to make some money.


Yup. The luxury tax system is about small market teams not being able to make a buck, not about them being unable to compete.

I am not sure there is a realistic system to create competitive balance, given the unique natural of basketball where a small number of stars give the teams that acquire them a disproportionate advantage.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 4:48 pm    Post subject:

Dr. Laker wrote:
The point is that, technically, the NBA is an equal partnership of 32 owners. In that partnership, however, revenue is not shared equally. Markets like OKC (44th), San Antonio (31st), Memphis (51st), etc., are at a financial disadvantage compared to New York (1st), LA (2nd), San Francisco (6th) and cannot ever generate the same revenue.


First, a couple quibbles. The NBA is not a partnership, and there are not 32 teams. The NBA does not have a single entity model like MLS.

More importantly, your comments identify one of the distinguishing features of the NBA (and MLB) compared to the NFL: the significance of local revenues. Local TV revenue is probably the greatest single difference between the large market teams and the small market teams. The ticket prices are a lot higher in LA and NYC than in the small markets, for sure, but the disparity in local TV revenue is striking.

In the NFL, a team like the Packers gets its share of the national TV contract. The differences in revenues are smaller. This is one of the major reasons why the dynamics of the NFL as so different from the NBA.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 4:49 pm    Post subject:

Cry me a river or just break it up.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 4:56 pm    Post subject:

Keith wrote a great write up on this and I completely agree with it.

Quote:
By: Keith Smith | July 13, 2022

Almost immediately after the Golden State Warriors won the 2022 NBA Finals, the criticisms started. Their fourth title in eight years was called a “checkbook win”. There’s also been reporting that Joe Lacob’s fellow NBA governors are upset about the Warriors lavish spending.

To be fair, Golden State has outspent the rest of the NBA by a wide margin over the last half-decade or so. That’s a fact.

Last season, the Warriors were over $39 million over the luxury tax line. That amount, combined with the subsequent penalties for being so far over the tax, plus being a luxury tax repeater team, hit Golden State with a total tax bill of over $170 million.

The second-most expensive team in terms of total tax bill? The Brooklyn Nets at roughly $97.7 million. Third on the list were the LA Clippers at $83 million.

That’s $72 million to $87 million more than the next two most expensive teams in the NBA last season. Even more staggering? The Warriors paid far more in luxury taxes than the other four tax teams did combined. The Milwaukee Bucks, Los Angeles Lakers, Utah Jazz and Philadelphia 76ers combined to pay approximately $131.7 million in tax payments last season. That’s more than $38 million less than the Warriors.

The other 23 teams? No tax payments at all. They all got a check from the tax teams that totaled about $11 million per non-taxpaying team.

Even if you consider the Nets and Clippers to be within range of the Warriors, that still leaves 27 teams fighting to catch the champs in terms of spending. Thus, the bellyaching that Golden State is operating in a realm the rest of the NBA can’t hope to play in.

Boo hoo. Grab a tissue and wipe your tears while the world’s smallest violin plays a somber tune for your melancholy.

Yes, small market teams probably can’t spend what the Warriors are spending. That is true. The TV and metro markets of teams like the San Antonio Spurs, Oklahoma City Thunder, New Orleans Pelicans and Memphis Grizzlies are a fraction of that of Golden State’s market. They’d have struggles keeping up that level of spending over a period of a few years, never mind over the bulk of a decade.

But the Milwaukee Bucks and Utah Jazz are in markets as small as the teams listed above and both were luxury tax teams last season. The “small market” Portland Trail Blazers have regularly been tax payers too.

Market size clearly doesn’t, and shouldn’t, dictate ownership’s willingness to pay the tax. When you have the right team, you pay for it. Compete for titles, and you get expensive. That’s just how it works in the NBA. Even the small-market-example-of-excellence Spurs regularly paid the tax when they were competing to win the Finals.

And that’s the real crux of this argument. Have the Golden State Warriors bought championships, à la the accusation often leveled at the George Steinbrenner-era New York Yankees?

No. Or, at least, not exactly.

Since the Warriors won their first title in 2016, they’ve paid the tax in five of eight seasons. In their four championship seasons, Golden State has only actually paid the tax in two of those years.

Now, this year’s tax bill got a bit out of control. But that’s come from years of spending starting to add up, as opposed to a one-year, or series of one-year, spending sprees. That’s one place where the comparisons to the Yankees fall apart.

The other place the Yankees comp comes up short? The Warriors aren’t building the bulk of their roster through free agent signings and trading for players other teams can no longer afford.

Here’s the Warriors roster from last season and how they acquired each player:

Nemanja Bjelica – 2021 Minimum Exception
Stephen Curry – 2009 Draft
Draymond Green – 2012 Draft
Andre Iguodala – 2021 Minimum Exception
Jonathan Kuminga – 2021 Draft
Damion Lee – 2018 Minimum Exception
Kevon Looney – 2015 Draft
Moses Moody – 2021 Draft
Gary Payton II – 2021 Minimum Exception
Jordan Poole – 2019 Draft
Otto Porter Jr. – 2021 Minimum Exception
Klay Thompson – 2011 Draft
Juan Toscano-Anderson – 2020 Minimum Exception
Andrew Wiggins – 2020 Trade
James Wiseman 2020 Draft
Chris Chiozza – 2021 Two-Way
Quinndary Weatherspoon – 2021 Two-Way
Here’s how those acquisitions break down:

Draft – 8 players
Minimum Exception – 6 players
Two-Way – 2 players
Trade – 1 player
Outside of Andrew Wiggins, every player on the roster was acquirable by a means available to every other team. With eight players acquired via the draft, the Warriors are one of the more homegrown teams in the NBA. Funnily enough, the highest-drafted of those eight players, James Wiseman, didn’t even appear in a game last season.

Now, that homegrown talent has largely blossomed and they’ve signed very lucrative contract extensions, followed by second and third extensions by some of the players. That’s largely what pushes Golden State’s salary plus tax commitment into the stratosphere.

Yes, they acquired Wiggins through a chain of transactions that relates back to signing Kevin Durant as a free agent. But even that original Durant acquisition wasn’t about just overpaying and “buying” a title. That 2016 signing was aided by a cap spike and the vastly under-market deal of Stephen Curry at the time.

After his initial 1+1 deal, Durant opted out. He did the same thing one more time. In total, Durant signed three different deals with the Warriors to keep pushing his salary higher. But when Durant wanted to leave, Golden State didn’t just let him walk. They kept that salary slot alive by working a double sign-and-trade to acquire D’Angelo Russell.

About seven months later, Russell was flipped for Wiggins, and his then-seen-as toxic contract. Two-and-a-half seasons and a title later, opinions on Wiggins’ deal have softened or flipped entirely.

In total, the Warriors made one chained-together set of deals that turned Durant into Russell into Wiggins that was even remotely enabled by their ability to spend.

Beyond that Durant-Russell-Wiggins salary slot, of which you can find a similarly exorbitant deal on the books of almost every team in the NBA over the last decade, all the Warriors have done is paid to keep their own players, while largely filling out their roster with minimum signings.

Which begs the questions: Was Golden State supposed to let their own players leave? Are the Warriors to be faulted for drafting and developing, and then paying, Stephen Curry, Draymond Green and Klay Thompson? How about Jordan Poole when he’s next to sign a big new deal?

If the answer is no, then what’s the crying about? The name of the game, for all 30 NBA teams, is always “draft and develop” first. The Warriors have simply been better at that than most for a decade.

The next logical question becomes: Can, or could, any other team have continued to up their salary plus tax commitment over a long period to keep a title team together?

This one is a little more complicated. But outside of the situation where James Harden was traded from Oklahoma City to Houston, what title contender has ever failed to pay to keep an All-Star around? To go a bit further: what team, in general, has lost an All-Star in the last 20 years because of salary concerns?

Yes, that was answering a question with more questions. But the answer to number of All-Stars leaving because their teams wouldn’t pay them is exactly zero. 0. None. Nada. Nil. Zilch. When All-Stars have left teams, it’s been to try to win somewhere else, often at the cost of giving up salary by leaving.

In an era where there are often complaints about super teams and players jumping from team to team seemingly on a whim, Golden State Warriors has built a team of mostly homegrown players and they’ve won more than anyone else over the past decade.

Instead of complaining about the Warriors largesse and skyrocketing tax bills, maybe the fingers should be pointed in the other direction. Why aren’t more teams drafting and developing better? And then, if they do, why aren’t they able to keep those teams together?

The answers to those questions probably aren’t money-based. Those teams didn’t stay together because of other reasons, often driven by failures of the teams or the players on those teams to win enough to keep everyone happy and home.

In a league where every team is owned by billionaires, it’s true that the Golden State Warriors have outspent everyone else. Not because they are the only ones who can, but because they’re the only ones who have. And it’s because they’ve outplayed everyone else during that same period and kept their team together in an era where that rarely happens. That’s a combination that should be applauded and respected instead of abhorred and reviled.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 5:04 pm    Post subject:

activeverb wrote:
Dr. Laker wrote:
MJST wrote:
Teams that build primarily through the draft shouldn't pay more than the teams that just bring in big name Free Agents at a high price.

If the whole point of "small market" and "building the right way" is the NBA wanting teams to do it through the draft as opposed to teaming up and forming Super Teams with a bunch of Max Players.. then the teams that0 do it the "right way" shouldn't be financially punished as much as the teams that do it the "wrong way" The NBA doesn't want.


That's not the point, at all.

The point is that, technically, the NBA is an equal partnership of 32 owners. In that partnership, however, revenue is not shared equally. Markets like OKC (44th), San Antonio (31st), Memphis (51st), etc., are at a financial disadvantage compared to New York (1st), LA (2nd), San Francisco (6th) and cannot ever generate the same revenue.

You might say "tough beans - they should work harder/smarter," but the big market teams need them, too. A - they have to have someone to play, and B - the more teams, the bigger the pile of revenue.

The smaller market teams that have changed hands have HUGE mortgages and expenses - without revenue sharing and luxury tax payments, some of them wouldn't turn a profit - and every partner in a megabillion dollar industry should be able to make some money.


Yup. The luxury tax system is about small market teams not being able to make a buck, not about them being unable to compete.

I am not sure there is a realistic system to create competitive balance, given the unique natural of basketball where a small number of stars give the teams that acquire them a disproportionate advantage.


Get rid of the salary cap.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 5:09 pm    Post subject:

Re: Keith Smart's article

That's a pretty weak apology for the Warriors. He sort of rambles around in search of a point. He does seem to be very impressed with himself. But my favorite part is this bit of sophistry: "Which begs the questions: Was Golden State supposed to let their own players leave?" The answer is YES. That's the whole damn point of the luxury tax system.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 5:14 pm    Post subject:

Aeneas Hunter wrote:
Re: Keith Smart's article

That's a pretty weak apology for the Warriors. He sort of rambles around in search of a point. He does seem to be very impressed with himself. But my favorite part is this bit of sophistry: "Which begs the questions: Was Golden State supposed to let their own players leave?" The answer is YES. That's the whole damn point of the luxury tax system.


It's the whole point of salary cap systems in general, yeah

I actually enjoyed seeing GSW win last year. I hated them when KD went there but it was nice seeing Curry do his thing again. But if a system allows teams to keep everyone important they want then imo the salary cap system in place doesn't work. But it's what the Union wants so it's what we get.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 5:24 pm    Post subject:

Aeneas Hunter wrote:
Re: Keith Smart's article

That's a pretty weak apology for the Warriors. He sort of rambles around in search of a point. He does seem to be very impressed with himself. But my favorite part is this bit of sophistry: "Which begs the questions: Was Golden State supposed to let their own players leave?" The answer is YES. That's the whole damn point of the luxury tax system.


Yeah, welcome to reality for most teams in all of Sports pretty much. It's kind of disgusting Lacob truthfully believes what he is saying and thinks he's a victim to a "very unfair" luxury tax system. He should have just stayed quiet on the issue and soon wear his new Championship ring to anyone doubting him. Coming out and playing victim is pretty much the worse way he could handle it and is a no win situation.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 5:28 pm    Post subject:

Mechanisms are placed to give the home team advantage in retaining a player tho.

Designated player maxes giving extra years.

Bird right exceptions to breach the cap, where premium rights are earned in a longer tenure with that particular homer team (ie higher annual raises, NTCs earned, etc).

Trade bonuses, paid entirely by the home team, if/when they decide to trade their own player away.

We applaud lifers like Magic, Kob, Duncan. Dame is trying to champion that narrative for himself.

The CBA is set up where teams trying to discard their own and poach others are placed at a disadvantage for both player and a team.

At its core, the CBA encourages player retention. If that leads to a repeater luxury tax, it’s almost like being penalized for having a great scouting team & player developmental team that continuously drafts/develops players capable of 10+ years in the league earning above average pay.

Are you supposed to just met that player go even though the system in place encourages retention?
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 5:42 pm    Post subject:

vasashi17+ wrote:
Are you supposed to just met that player go even though the system in place encourages retention?


Yes. I understand (and respect) the folks who don't think that there should be a salary cap or a luxury tax. But these things exist. They were implemented to generate at least some degree of competitive balance, however imperfect, in a league of teams that are not economically balanced. And you know what? Since all of this stuff got implemented in the early '10s, the owners have made a freaking fortune. Lacob has seen the value of his franchise go up by Billions. The next TV deal may be mammoth and make even more money for everyone.

So now Lacob's a victim. Give me a break.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 5:50 pm    Post subject:

Cheap ass owner. He didn't resign Otto Porter Jr and Gary Payton II because he didn't want to pay the luxury tax.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 5:53 pm    Post subject:

@AH: I got no interest in keeping Lacob’s vault full so he can McDuck in it all day. The tale I’m trying to show is high functioning teams should not be taxed for doing their damn job well.

If a team is killing it by drafting, developing and retaining said players giving them their much deserved bag, then those particular teams staffed by capable high performing individuals should receive some type of exemption from a more punitive tax bracket. Those taxes should instead be considered bonuses that owners should distribute to their bball ops staff.

Imho that would encourage most owners to employ deserving and capable folks for their franchises.

Ya dig?
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deal
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 6:13 pm    Post subject:

vasashi17+ wrote:
@AH: I got no interest in keeping Lacob’s vault full so he can McDuck in it all day. The tale I’m trying to show is high functioning teams should not be taxed for doing their damn job well.

If a team is killing it by drafting, developing and retaining said players giving them their much deserved bag, then those particular teams staffed by capable high performing individuals should receive some type of exemption from a more punitive tax bracket. Those taxes should instead be considered bonuses that owners should distribute to their bball ops staff.

Imho that would encourage most owners to employ deserving and capable folks for their franchises.

Ya dig?



Not measurable, not everyone can be successful....You'll need total everyone consistently...
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 6:23 pm    Post subject:

vasashi17+ wrote:
@AH: I got no interest in keeping Lacob’s vault full so he can McDuck in it all day. The tale I’m trying to show is high functioning teams should not be taxed for doing their damn job well.

If a team is killing it by drafting, developing and retaining said players giving them their much deserved bag, then those particular teams staffed by capable high performing individuals should receive some type of exemption from a more punitive tax bracket. Those taxes should instead be considered bonuses that owners should distribute to their bball ops staff.

Imho that would encourage most owners to employ deserving and capable folks for their franchises.

Ya dig?


No, I don't buy it. The NBA teams operate within a fixed economic system that has many aspects other than the luxury tax. Example: maximum salaries. No one can offer Steph Curry more than the Warriors can. If Mark Cuban wants to offer him more than the Warriors, he can't. Example: The draft and scale contracts. Jordan Poole has a fixed salary and cannot be signed by other teams. As was once the case with Curry, Thompson, and Green, the Warriors get exclusive rights at a controlled price until they decide whether Poole is someone they want to keep. They can trade him right now on his rookie scale contract.

The system as a whole -- all of its component parts -- is designed to achieve a result. The components are all negotiated and interdependent, even if it may not seem that way from the outside. You can't just pick and choose the parts of the system that you want.

Part of this system was born from a battle between the big market teams and the small market teams. The small market teams don't give a rat's ass about how smart Lacob thinks he is. And you know what? The league has done really well, and it isn't due to the genius of Lacob.
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vasashi17+
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2022 6:29 pm    Post subject:

^@deal: Maybe they make it quantifiable in the same manner they do the repeater tax. In a 4 yr window, if a team earns a winning record and/or certain playoff advancements 3 times, then they receive a tax exemption particularly if they’re also a repeat tax offender.

The same “measurables” can be applied to player retention frequency & length/amount of player contracts.

All I’m saying is that there should be a reward/bonus of some sort for high performing franchises proving the capability over several years. The NBA becomes a better product and you can earn better TV deals in the future.

Just a thought.
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