If Robert Horry played in today's NBA
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Rek
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 15, 2022 8:53 pm    Post subject: If Robert Horry played in today's NBA

Unlike so many of you that were big-time fans during the entire LakeShow era, I moved from the greater Chicago area to SoCal during the summer of 2004 - when Shaq was traded and LAL transitioned into the Kobe lead period. I was a huge fan of the Jordan-Pippen Bulls. But, I always liked the Lakers specifically because of Kobe and how much he modeled his game from MJ, and how crazy good of a job he did with more length and amazing athleticism. All that being said, I really only know most of the LakeShow role players from the popular highlights. Everyone knows about Horry's incredible shots when it really mattered. But, I won't pretend to know much about him beyond that.

I was thinking to myself that he could be an even more significant player in today's game with the emphasis on perimeter shooting, avoiding low percentage shots, etc. I was pretty surprised to see that his career 3-pt % was only 34.1 even though that's still decent. I would imagine that if he played now he would likely be able to improve that percentage since the 3-ball is so much more prominent in the modern NBA.

I'm curious to hear from the fans that know his game. Would Big Shot Rob still just be a role player with a knack for hitting timely shots or would he be more prominent in the current NBA because of the changes? I suspect that he would be an even more sought-after player now. But, I lack the perspective on his overall game to make an educated assessment. Where would he stack up now? Which players today would be a good comparison?

Thanks in advance for any insight.
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 15, 2022 9:21 pm    Post subject:

Rek wrote:
Unlike so many of you that were big-time fans during the entire LakeShow era, I moved from the greater Chicago area to SoCal during the summer of 2004 - when Shaq was traded and LAL transitioned into the Kobe lead period. I was a huge fan of the Jordan-Pippen Bulls. But, I always liked the Lakers specifically because of Kobe and how much he modeled his game from MJ, and how crazy good of a job he did with more length and amazing athleticism. All that being said, I really only know most of the LakeShow role players from the popular highlights. Everyone knows about Horry's incredible shots when it really mattered. But, I won't pretend to know much about him beyond that.

I was thinking to myself that he could be an even more significant player in today's game with the emphasis on perimeter shooting, avoiding low percentage shots, etc. I was pretty surprised to see that his career 3-pt % was only 34.1 even though that's still decent. I would imagine that if he played now he would likely be able to improve that percentage since the 3-ball is so much more prominent in the modern NBA.

I'm curious to hear from the fans that know his game. Would Big Shot Rob still just be a role player with a knack for hitting timely shots or would he be more prominent in the current NBA because of the changes? I suspect that he would be an even more sought-after player now. But, I lack the perspective on his overall game to make an educated assessment. Where would he stack up now? Which players today would be a good comparison?

Thanks in advance for any insight.



The current players I'd considered most comparable to Horry would be Danny Green, Andre Iguodala, and Robert Covington.

Solid three-and-d guys who are versatile enough to help out any team.

If Horry played today, he might have a tiny uptick in 3-point shooting percentage, but I doubt it would be a dramatic improvement. I doubt he would be an all-star, though he's the type of guy (like Iguodala) who you could imagine squeaking onto the team one year if all the stars aligned just right.

Horry's reputation is largely based on winning 6 rings and hitting some big shots. His day-to-day, year-to-year performance was unremarkable.

Because Horry played in an era that made dynasties more likely, and he was fortunate enough to play on some great teams, he collected rings in bunches. If he played today, that probably wouldn't be the case, so my guess is his reputation would be a little less lofty if he played today.
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 15, 2022 10:46 pm    Post subject:

I would say the biggest thing with Horry was that he seemed to find a way to step up in big moments. Not just hitting big shots. He'd grab crucial rebounds, come flying in and get a block out of nowhere.

He probably could have been a better player than he was. But he had off court issues like a sick child to deal with. When the game was on the line though he had an extra deal to step up. I don't think you can group that into him just hitting big shots. As a Laker most of his reputation was built on game winning threes, and in particular saving the threepeat against the Kings. But he had some larger performance with the Spurs and Rockets. Game 5 Spurs vs. Pistons he was huge down the stretch up to and including the game winner.

Three point shooting aside, I think his game would have fit well with the modern small ball lineups, due to his ability to switch and defend, and block shots.
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 15, 2022 10:59 pm    Post subject: Re: If Robert Horry played in today's NBA

Rek wrote:
I was pretty surprised to see that his career 3-pt % was only 34.1 even though that's still decent.

I’d guess he wrecked it by several digits with that 2003 playoff run.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 2:29 am    Post subject:

Horry as a Rocket and in his first year with the Lakers was a springy hybrid forward with a good three point shot and a genius level of awareness on help defense. He was never really a true stopper/shut down one on one forward but he was brilliant within a team defense scheme. One on one wise, I used to see small forwards like Ceballos and power forwards like Malone score on him at will and without too much trouble. Also he was a weak ball-handler and couldn't create at all off the bounce. I think the Robert Covington comparison is right on target but not Iguodala as Iggy is a better stopper than Horry was.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 4:25 am    Post subject:

Horry averaged 7 ppg for his career. He averaged 7.9 ppg in the playoffs. That's who he was. He was a good guy to have around the team, but the big plays inflate his reputation as a player. His career was about moments, not about seasons or even games.

The Rockets traded him to Detroit for Sean Elliott. Horry actually received his new uniform from the Pistons. Then Elliott failed his physical, and the deal was off. That experience jolted him, and he played more aggressively for a time. But it didn't last.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 5:06 am    Post subject:

He would be more valued in today's NBA game for sure, but I don't think he changes his role all that much. He'd have a bigger green light to shoot the 3s and defending some 4/5s would be easier for him now vs back then.

He'd probably hover at 10-12 ppg with more 3 pointers made and be a MLE-15M a year type of player. I think someone mentioned Covington, that's a decent comparison to what he'd be seen as value wise.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 5:15 am    Post subject:

Maybe like the Morris twins?
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 6:45 am    Post subject:

activeverb wrote:
Rek wrote:
Unlike so many of you that were big-time fans during the entire LakeShow era, I moved from the greater Chicago area to SoCal during the summer of 2004 - when Shaq was traded and LAL transitioned into the Kobe lead period. I was a huge fan of the Jordan-Pippen Bulls. But, I always liked the Lakers specifically because of Kobe and how much he modeled his game from MJ, and how crazy good of a job he did with more length and amazing athleticism. All that being said, I really only know most of the LakeShow role players from the popular highlights. Everyone knows about Horry's incredible shots when it really mattered. But, I won't pretend to know much about him beyond that.

I was thinking to myself that he could be an even more significant player in today's game with the emphasis on perimeter shooting, avoiding low percentage shots, etc. I was pretty surprised to see that his career 3-pt % was only 34.1 even though that's still decent. I would imagine that if he played now he would likely be able to improve that percentage since the 3-ball is so much more prominent in the modern NBA.

I'm curious to hear from the fans that know his game. Would Big Shot Rob still just be a role player with a knack for hitting timely shots or would he be more prominent in the current NBA because of the changes? I suspect that he would be an even more sought-after player now. But, I lack the perspective on his overall game to make an educated assessment. Where would he stack up now? Which players today would be a good comparison?

Thanks in advance for any insight.



The current players I'd considered most comparable to Horry would be Danny Green, Andre Iguodala, and Robert Covington.

Solid three-and-d guys who are versatile enough to help out any team.

If Horry played today, he might have a tiny uptick in 3-point shooting percentage, but I doubt it would be a dramatic improvement. I doubt he would be an all-star, though he's the type of guy (like Iguodala) who you could imagine squeaking onto the team one year if all the stars aligned just right.

Horry's reputation is largely based on winning 6 rings and hitting some big shots. His day-to-day, year-to-year performance was unremarkable.

Because Horry played in an era that made dynasties more likely, and he was fortunate enough to play on some great teams, he collected rings in bunches. If he played today, that probably wouldn't be the case, so my guess is his reputation would be a little less lofty if he played today.


Big Shot Rob actually won 7 Rings.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 7:00 am    Post subject:

Horry might have put up better numbers in today's NBA, because his coaches wouldn't have looked at his height and tried to bulk him up so he could play power forward.

His best statistical seasons as a starter were when he played small. I'm sure bulking up and the wear and tear from guarding bigger post up players over the years impacted his mobility, which in turn impacted his perimeter defense and offensive ability.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 7:15 am    Post subject:

I would happily have him on my team. Knack for hitting big time shots. His numbers weren't impressive, but his results were.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 7:19 am    Post subject:

Laker4lifer4real wrote:
activeverb wrote:
Rek wrote:
Unlike so many of you that were big-time fans during the entire LakeShow era, I moved from the greater Chicago area to SoCal during the summer of 2004 - when Shaq was traded and LAL transitioned into the Kobe lead period. I was a huge fan of the Jordan-Pippen Bulls. But, I always liked the Lakers specifically because of Kobe and how much he modeled his game from MJ, and how crazy good of a job he did with more length and amazing athleticism. All that being said, I really only know most of the LakeShow role players from the popular highlights. Everyone knows about Horry's incredible shots when it really mattered. But, I won't pretend to know much about him beyond that.

I was thinking to myself that he could be an even more significant player in today's game with the emphasis on perimeter shooting, avoiding low percentage shots, etc. I was pretty surprised to see that his career 3-pt % was only 34.1 even though that's still decent. I would imagine that if he played now he would likely be able to improve that percentage since the 3-ball is so much more prominent in the modern NBA.

I'm curious to hear from the fans that know his game. Would Big Shot Rob still just be a role player with a knack for hitting timely shots or would he be more prominent in the current NBA because of the changes? I suspect that he would be an even more sought-after player now. But, I lack the perspective on his overall game to make an educated assessment. Where would he stack up now? Which players today would be a good comparison?

Thanks in advance for any insight.



The current players I'd considered most comparable to Horry would be Danny Green, Andre Iguodala, and Robert Covington.

Solid three-and-d guys who are versatile enough to help out any team.

If Horry played today, he might have a tiny uptick in 3-point shooting percentage, but I doubt it would be a dramatic improvement. I doubt he would be an all-star, though he's the type of guy (like Iguodala) who you could imagine squeaking onto the team one year if all the stars aligned just right.

Horry's reputation is largely based on winning 6 rings and hitting some big shots. His day-to-day, year-to-year performance was unremarkable.

Because Horry played in an era that made dynasties more likely, and he was fortunate enough to play on some great teams, he collected rings in bunches. If he played today, that probably wouldn't be the case, so my guess is his reputation would be a little less lofty if he played today.


Big Shot Rob actually won 7 Rings.


That's right. Amazing -- guy won 7 rings, but I am not sure if he was ever one of the top 5 players on any of those ring teams. Odd career.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 8:00 am    Post subject:

LakersInFour wrote:
Horry might have put up better numbers in today's NBA, because his coaches wouldn't have looked at his height and tried to bulk him up so he could play power forward.

His best statistical seasons as a starter were when he played small. I'm sure bulking up and the wear and tear from guarding bigger post up players over the years impacted his mobility, which in turn impacted his perimeter defense and offensive ability.

This makes good sense. I hadn't even considered that guys above a certain height were generally forced to bulk up.

Thanks to several of you for giving plenty of insight. I didn't expect that Horry would be considered an all-star guy or anything like that. But, was envisioning him as being more impactful as a perimeter scoring threat. Also, some of the guys that were consistently effective defenders back then may have trouble adapting to today's ticky-tack fouls, no hand checking allowed and so on.

I never thought of it myself, but, have to agree that the Covington comparison seems like a good fit.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 8:12 am    Post subject:

activeverb wrote:


That's right. Amazing -- guy won 7 rings, but I am not sure if he was ever one of the top 5 players on any of those ring teams. Odd career.


Horry's impact was more than his stat line. He was a system guy and a glue guy. Ideal PF for a team with a dominant post player - good enough from 3 that he had to be covered, ran the floor well, solid weakside shot blocker, long enough to guard legit 4s, but quick enough to switch onto smalls.

That 2002-03 season was brutal for Horry. The team was just tired after three long playoff runs and Horry was playing way too many minutes because of Shaq's "injury" (it was really a boycott/feud with Buss over money). He went to the Spurs in the same role - but with reduced minutes - and bounced back.

It's easy to overlook him. but Horry was an important piece on 7 ring winners. On the 3-peat Lakers, I definitely have him as top 5.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 8:25 am    Post subject:

I think defensively his job would be a lot easier today. He had a difficult time guarding players like Rasheed Wallace, Karl Malone, Tim Duncan, Chris Webber, etc. The league today doesn’t have all the dominant big men it used to have.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 8:42 am    Post subject:

Steve007 wrote:
I think defensively his job would be a lot easier today. He had a difficult time guarding players like Rasheed Wallace, Karl Malone, Tim Duncan, Chris Webber, etc. The league today doesn’t have all the dominant big men it used to have.


Who didn't? 3 HOF and a 4X All-Star?

The Western Conference was LOADED back then - especially at PF.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 8:45 am    Post subject:

Dr. Laker wrote:
activeverb wrote:


That's right. Amazing -- guy won 7 rings, but I am not sure if he was ever one of the top 5 players on any of those ring teams. Odd career.


Horry's impact was more than his stat line. He was a system guy and a glue guy. Ideal PF for a team with a dominant post player - good enough from 3 that he had to be covered, ran the floor well, solid weakside shot blocker, long enough to guard legit 4s, but quick enough to switch onto smalls.

That 2002-03 season was brutal for Horry. The team was just tired after three long playoff runs and Horry was playing way too many minutes because of Shaq's "injury" (it was really a boycott/feud with Buss over money). He went to the Spurs in the same role - but with reduced minutes - and bounced back.

It's easy to overlook him. but Horry was an important piece on 7 ring winners. On the 3-peat Lakers, I definitely have him as top 5.


Allowing Horace Grant to leave was a negative as well. Malone, Shaq, Grant, Horry as your big rotation would have been impressive.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 9:17 am    Post subject:

activeverb wrote:
Rek wrote:
Unlike so many of you that were big-time fans during the entire LakeShow era, I moved from the greater Chicago area to SoCal during the summer of 2004 - when Shaq was traded and LAL transitioned into the Kobe lead period. I was a huge fan of the Jordan-Pippen Bulls. But, I always liked the Lakers specifically because of Kobe and how much he modeled his game from MJ, and how crazy good of a job he did with more length and amazing athleticism. All that being said, I really only know most of the LakeShow role players from the popular highlights. Everyone knows about Horry's incredible shots when it really mattered. But, I won't pretend to know much about him beyond that.

I was thinking to myself that he could be an even more significant player in today's game with the emphasis on perimeter shooting, avoiding low percentage shots, etc. I was pretty surprised to see that his career 3-pt % was only 34.1 even though that's still decent. I would imagine that if he played now he would likely be able to improve that percentage since the 3-ball is so much more prominent in the modern NBA.

I'm curious to hear from the fans that know his game. Would Big Shot Rob still just be a role player with a knack for hitting timely shots or would he be more prominent in the current NBA because of the changes? I suspect that he would be an even more sought-after player now. But, I lack the perspective on his overall game to make an educated assessment. Where would he stack up now? Which players today would be a good comparison?

Thanks in advance for any insight.



The current players I'd considered most comparable to Horry would be Danny Green, Andre Iguodala, and Robert Covington.

Solid three-and-d guys who are versatile enough to help out any team.

If Horry played today, he might have a tiny uptick in 3-point shooting percentage, but I doubt it would be a dramatic improvement. I doubt he would be an all-star, though he's the type of guy (like Iguodala) who you could imagine squeaking onto the team one year if all the stars aligned just right.

Horry's reputation is largely based on winning 6 rings and hitting some big shots. His day-to-day, year-to-year performance was unremarkable.

Because Horry played in an era that made dynasties more likely, and he was fortunate enough to play on some great teams, he collected rings in bunches. If he played today, that probably wouldn't be the case, so my guess is his reputation would be a little less lofty if he played today.


I feel like Horry's Rockets tenure is being overlooked and his Rockets tenure is our best insight into how he would fare in today's NBA...

The Rockets were way ahead of their time. Yes, they had that franchise center in Hakeem, but they were also a high-volume 3pt shooting team (for their time). In their first title season, 1995, the Rockets took the most 3s per game in the entire league — nearly 200 more 3s during the season than the second team and OVER DOUBLE the Jazz who took the least amount of 3s.

Rudy T had the Rockets playing inside-out, which wasn't unusual, but he was one of the first coaches to encourage the "out" and let that spacing on the perimeter work for him and the team.

Robert Horry, as a stretchy 4 encouraged to take the open 3s that Hakeem's gravity provided, averaged 11.1 PPG on a 37.1 3P% and 4.6 3pt attempts per game.

To contrast, Horry only averaged 1.9 3pt attempts per game as a Laker. (Horry's 25 MPG on the Lakers vs. his 35 MPG on the Rocket's doesn't account for this discrepancy either.)

In today's NBA, Horry would have the spacing he had on the Rockets, and even more of a green light to take 3s (with far less defensive wear and tear from the big and bruising low post 4s of his era).

It is easy to imagine Horry playing like Bojan Bogdanović - taking 6-7 3pt attempts per game, hitting 38-39% from three, and averaging in the mid to late teens on PPG.


Last edited by ArminNBA on Fri Sep 16, 2022 9:27 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 9:25 am    Post subject:

ArminNBA wrote:
activeverb wrote:
Rek wrote:
Unlike so many of you that were big-time fans during the entire LakeShow era, I moved from the greater Chicago area to SoCal during the summer of 2004 - when Shaq was traded and LAL transitioned into the Kobe lead period. I was a huge fan of the Jordan-Pippen Bulls. But, I always liked the Lakers specifically because of Kobe and how much he modeled his game from MJ, and how crazy good of a job he did with more length and amazing athleticism. All that being said, I really only know most of the LakeShow role players from the popular highlights. Everyone knows about Horry's incredible shots when it really mattered. But, I won't pretend to know much about him beyond that.

I was thinking to myself that he could be an even more significant player in today's game with the emphasis on perimeter shooting, avoiding low percentage shots, etc. I was pretty surprised to see that his career 3-pt % was only 34.1 even though that's still decent. I would imagine that if he played now he would likely be able to improve that percentage since the 3-ball is so much more prominent in the modern NBA.

I'm curious to hear from the fans that know his game. Would Big Shot Rob still just be a role player with a knack for hitting timely shots or would he be more prominent in the current NBA because of the changes? I suspect that he would be an even more sought-after player now. But, I lack the perspective on his overall game to make an educated assessment. Where would he stack up now? Which players today would be a good comparison?

Thanks in advance for any insight.



The current players I'd considered most comparable to Horry would be Danny Green, Andre Iguodala, and Robert Covington.

Solid three-and-d guys who are versatile enough to help out any team.

If Horry played today, he might have a tiny uptick in 3-point shooting percentage, but I doubt it would be a dramatic improvement. I doubt he would be an all-star, though he's the type of guy (like Iguodala) who you could imagine squeaking onto the team one year if all the stars aligned just right.

Horry's reputation is largely based on winning 6 rings and hitting some big shots. His day-to-day, year-to-year performance was unremarkable.

Because Horry played in an era that made dynasties more likely, and he was fortunate enough to play on some great teams, he collected rings in bunches. If he played today, that probably wouldn't be the case, so my guess is his reputation would be a little less lofty if he played today.


I feel like Horry's Rockets tenure is being overlooked and his Rockets tenure is our best insight into how he would fare in today's NBA...

The Rockets were way ahead of their time. Yes, they had that franchise center. in Hakeem, but they were also a high-volume 3pt shooting team (for their time). In their first title season, 1995, the Rockets took the most 3s per game in the entire league — nearly 200 more 3s during the season than the second team and OVER DOUBLE the Jazz who took the least amount of 3s.

Rudy T had the Rockets playing inside-out, which wasn't unusual, but he was one of the first coaches to encourage the "out" and let that spacing on the perimeter work for him and the team.

Robert Horry, as a stretchy 4 encouraged to take the open 3s that Hakeem's gravity provided, averaged 11.1 PPG on a 37.1 3P% and 4.6 3pt attempts per game.

To contrast, Horry only averaged 1.9 3pt attempts per game as a Laker. (Horry's 25 MPG on the Lakers vs. his 35 MPG on the Rocket's doesn't account for this discrepancy either.)

In today's NBA, Horry would have the spacing he had on the Rockets, and even more of a green light to take 3s (with far less defensive wear and tear from the big and bruising low post 4s of his era).

It is easy to imagine Horry playing like Bojan Bogdanović - taking 6-7 3pt attempts per game, hitting 38-39% from three, and averaging in the mid to late teens on PPG.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 11:04 am    Post subject:

ArminNBA wrote:
activeverb wrote:
Rek wrote:
Unlike so many of you that were big-time fans during the entire LakeShow era, I moved from the greater Chicago area to SoCal during the summer of 2004 - when Shaq was traded and LAL transitioned into the Kobe lead period. I was a huge fan of the Jordan-Pippen Bulls. But, I always liked the Lakers specifically because of Kobe and how much he modeled his game from MJ, and how crazy good of a job he did with more length and amazing athleticism. All that being said, I really only know most of the LakeShow role players from the popular highlights. Everyone knows about Horry's incredible shots when it really mattered. But, I won't pretend to know much about him beyond that.

I was thinking to myself that he could be an even more significant player in today's game with the emphasis on perimeter shooting, avoiding low percentage shots, etc. I was pretty surprised to see that his career 3-pt % was only 34.1 even though that's still decent. I would imagine that if he played now he would likely be able to improve that percentage since the 3-ball is so much more prominent in the modern NBA.

I'm curious to hear from the fans that know his game. Would Big Shot Rob still just be a role player with a knack for hitting timely shots or would he be more prominent in the current NBA because of the changes? I suspect that he would be an even more sought-after player now. But, I lack the perspective on his overall game to make an educated assessment. Where would he stack up now? Which players today would be a good comparison?

Thanks in advance for any insight.



The current players I'd considered most comparable to Horry would be Danny Green, Andre Iguodala, and Robert Covington.

Solid three-and-d guys who are versatile enough to help out any team.

If Horry played today, he might have a tiny uptick in 3-point shooting percentage, but I doubt it would be a dramatic improvement. I doubt he would be an all-star, though he's the type of guy (like Iguodala) who you could imagine squeaking onto the team one year if all the stars aligned just right.

Horry's reputation is largely based on winning 6 rings and hitting some big shots. His day-to-day, year-to-year performance was unremarkable.

Because Horry played in an era that made dynasties more likely, and he was fortunate enough to play on some great teams, he collected rings in bunches. If he played today, that probably wouldn't be the case, so my guess is his reputation would be a little less lofty if he played today.


I feel like Horry's Rockets tenure is being overlooked and his Rockets tenure is our best insight into how he would fare in today's NBA...

The Rockets were way ahead of their time. Yes, they had that franchise center in Hakeem, but they were also a high-volume 3pt shooting team (for their time). In their first title season, 1995, the Rockets took the most 3s per game in the entire league — nearly 200 more 3s during the season than the second team and OVER DOUBLE the Jazz who took the least amount of 3s.

Rudy T had the Rockets playing inside-out, which wasn't unusual, but he was one of the first coaches to encourage the "out" and let that spacing on the perimeter work for him and the team.

Robert Horry, as a stretchy 4 encouraged to take the open 3s that Hakeem's gravity provided, averaged 11.1 PPG on a 37.1 3P% and 4.6 3pt attempts per game.

To contrast, Horry only averaged 1.9 3pt attempts per game as a Laker. (Horry's 25 MPG on the Lakers vs. his 35 MPG on the Rocket's doesn't account for this discrepancy either.)

In today's NBA, Horry would have the spacing he had on the Rockets, and even more of a green light to take 3s (with far less defensive wear and tear from the big and bruising low post 4s of his era).

It is easy to imagine Horry playing like Bojan Bogdanović - taking 6-7 3pt attempts per game, hitting 38-39% from three, and averaging in the mid to late teens on PPG.


I always recalled Horry being a 3 in Houston. Otis Thorpe was their starting 4. Horry's comp early in his career was Scottie Pippen and he was traded to LA with the intent to replace Ceballos in the starting lineup. It wasn't until they signed Rick Fox and tried to free up more minutes for Kobe (with Nick and Eddie already in the fold) that Del opted to go with a 4-out lineup. They moved Horry to the 4 and asked him to bulk up so the Horry we all remember is not the same Horry that was once compared with Scottie Pippen.

Either way, Horry would have slotted in perfectly alongside AD and Lebron. He had the athleticism to guard the perimeter and his lack of bulk to take on the more rugged 4s would be less problematic in the modern NBA.
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ArminNBA
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 11:20 am    Post subject:

gng930 wrote:
ArminNBA wrote:
activeverb wrote:
Rek wrote:
Unlike so many of you that were big-time fans during the entire LakeShow era, I moved from the greater Chicago area to SoCal during the summer of 2004 - when Shaq was traded and LAL transitioned into the Kobe lead period. I was a huge fan of the Jordan-Pippen Bulls. But, I always liked the Lakers specifically because of Kobe and how much he modeled his game from MJ, and how crazy good of a job he did with more length and amazing athleticism. All that being said, I really only know most of the LakeShow role players from the popular highlights. Everyone knows about Horry's incredible shots when it really mattered. But, I won't pretend to know much about him beyond that.

I was thinking to myself that he could be an even more significant player in today's game with the emphasis on perimeter shooting, avoiding low percentage shots, etc. I was pretty surprised to see that his career 3-pt % was only 34.1 even though that's still decent. I would imagine that if he played now he would likely be able to improve that percentage since the 3-ball is so much more prominent in the modern NBA.

I'm curious to hear from the fans that know his game. Would Big Shot Rob still just be a role player with a knack for hitting timely shots or would he be more prominent in the current NBA because of the changes? I suspect that he would be an even more sought-after player now. But, I lack the perspective on his overall game to make an educated assessment. Where would he stack up now? Which players today would be a good comparison?

Thanks in advance for any insight.



The current players I'd considered most comparable to Horry would be Danny Green, Andre Iguodala, and Robert Covington.

Solid three-and-d guys who are versatile enough to help out any team.

If Horry played today, he might have a tiny uptick in 3-point shooting percentage, but I doubt it would be a dramatic improvement. I doubt he would be an all-star, though he's the type of guy (like Iguodala) who you could imagine squeaking onto the team one year if all the stars aligned just right.

Horry's reputation is largely based on winning 6 rings and hitting some big shots. His day-to-day, year-to-year performance was unremarkable.

Because Horry played in an era that made dynasties more likely, and he was fortunate enough to play on some great teams, he collected rings in bunches. If he played today, that probably wouldn't be the case, so my guess is his reputation would be a little less lofty if he played today.


I feel like Horry's Rockets tenure is being overlooked and his Rockets tenure is our best insight into how he would fare in today's NBA...

The Rockets were way ahead of their time. Yes, they had that franchise center in Hakeem, but they were also a high-volume 3pt shooting team (for their time). In their first title season, 1995, the Rockets took the most 3s per game in the entire league — nearly 200 more 3s during the season than the second team and OVER DOUBLE the Jazz who took the least amount of 3s.

Rudy T had the Rockets playing inside-out, which wasn't unusual, but he was one of the first coaches to encourage the "out" and let that spacing on the perimeter work for him and the team.

Robert Horry, as a stretchy 4 encouraged to take the open 3s that Hakeem's gravity provided, averaged 11.1 PPG on a 37.1 3P% and 4.6 3pt attempts per game.

To contrast, Horry only averaged 1.9 3pt attempts per game as a Laker. (Horry's 25 MPG on the Lakers vs. his 35 MPG on the Rocket's doesn't account for this discrepancy either.)

In today's NBA, Horry would have the spacing he had on the Rockets, and even more of a green light to take 3s (with far less defensive wear and tear from the big and bruising low post 4s of his era).

It is easy to imagine Horry playing like Bojan Bogdanović - taking 6-7 3pt attempts per game, hitting 38-39% from three, and averaging in the mid to late teens on PPG.


I always recalled Horry being a 3 in Houston. Otis Thorpe was their starting 4. Horry's comp early in his career was Scottie Pippen and he was traded to LA with the intent to replace Ceballos in the starting lineup. It wasn't until they signed Rick Fox and tried to free up more minutes for Kobe (with Nick and Eddie already in the fold) that Del opted to go with a 4-out lineup. They moved Horry to the 4 and asked him to bulk up so the Horry we all remember is not the same Horry that was once compared with Scottie Pippen.

Either way, Horry would have slotted in perfectly alongside AD and Lebron. He had the athleticism to guard the perimeter and his lack of bulk to take on the more rugged 4s would be less problematic in the modern NBA.


That's correct in 1994. Mixed up the years. But Otis was traded in the middle of the 94-95 season and Horry played much more 4 in the 1995 playoffs.
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miggz23
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 11:39 am    Post subject:

MikeTrout wrote:
ArminNBA wrote:
activeverb wrote:
Rek wrote:
Unlike so many of you that were big-time fans during the entire LakeShow era, I moved from the greater Chicago area to SoCal during the summer of 2004 - when Shaq was traded and LAL transitioned into the Kobe lead period. I was a huge fan of the Jordan-Pippen Bulls. But, I always liked the Lakers specifically because of Kobe and how much he modeled his game from MJ, and how crazy good of a job he did with more length and amazing athleticism. All that being said, I really only know most of the LakeShow role players from the popular highlights. Everyone knows about Horry's incredible shots when it really mattered. But, I won't pretend to know much about him beyond that.

I was thinking to myself that he could be an even more significant player in today's game with the emphasis on perimeter shooting, avoiding low percentage shots, etc. I was pretty surprised to see that his career 3-pt % was only 34.1 even though that's still decent. I would imagine that if he played now he would likely be able to improve that percentage since the 3-ball is so much more prominent in the modern NBA.

I'm curious to hear from the fans that know his game. Would Big Shot Rob still just be a role player with a knack for hitting timely shots or would he be more prominent in the current NBA because of the changes? I suspect that he would be an even more sought-after player now. But, I lack the perspective on his overall game to make an educated assessment. Where would he stack up now? Which players today would be a good comparison?

Thanks in advance for any insight.



The current players I'd considered most comparable to Horry would be Danny Green, Andre Iguodala, and Robert Covington.

Solid three-and-d guys who are versatile enough to help out any team.

If Horry played today, he might have a tiny uptick in 3-point shooting percentage, but I doubt it would be a dramatic improvement. I doubt he would be an all-star, though he's the type of guy (like Iguodala) who you could imagine squeaking onto the team one year if all the stars aligned just right.

Horry's reputation is largely based on winning 6 rings and hitting some big shots. His day-to-day, year-to-year performance was unremarkable.

Because Horry played in an era that made dynasties more likely, and he was fortunate enough to play on some great teams, he collected rings in bunches. If he played today, that probably wouldn't be the case, so my guess is his reputation would be a little less lofty if he played today.


I feel like Horry's Rockets tenure is being overlooked and his Rockets tenure is our best insight into how he would fare in today's NBA...

The Rockets were way ahead of their time. Yes, they had that franchise center. in Hakeem, but they were also a high-volume 3pt shooting team (for their time). In their first title season, 1995, the Rockets took the most 3s per game in the entire league — nearly 200 more 3s during the season than the second team and OVER DOUBLE the Jazz who took the least amount of 3s.

Rudy T had the Rockets playing inside-out, which wasn't unusual, but he was one of the first coaches to encourage the "out" and let that spacing on the perimeter work for him and the team.

Robert Horry, as a stretchy 4 encouraged to take the open 3s that Hakeem's gravity provided, averaged 11.1 PPG on a 37.1 3P% and 4.6 3pt attempts per game.

To contrast, Horry only averaged 1.9 3pt attempts per game as a Laker. (Horry's 25 MPG on the Lakers vs. his 35 MPG on the Rocket's doesn't account for this discrepancy either.)

In today's NBA, Horry would have the spacing he had on the Rockets, and even more of a green light to take 3s (with far less defensive wear and tear from the big and bruising low post 4s of his era).

It is easy to imagine Horry playing like Bojan Bogdanović - taking 6-7 3pt attempts per game, hitting 38-39% from three, and averaging in the mid to late teens on PPG.


Good post


I believe Horry’s time with the Rockets were the years NBA shortened up the 3pt line… That might have played a role in more teams shooting 3s in that era.
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Rek
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 11:58 am    Post subject:

MikeTrout wrote:
ArminNBA wrote:
I feel like Horry's Rockets tenure is being overlooked and his Rockets tenure is our best insight into how he would fare in today's NBA...

The Rockets were way ahead of their time. Yes, they had that franchise center. in Hakeem, but they were also a high-volume 3pt shooting team (for their time). In their first title season, 1995, the Rockets took the most 3s per game in the entire league — nearly 200 more 3s during the season than the second team and OVER DOUBLE the Jazz who took the least amount of 3s.

Rudy T had the Rockets playing inside-out, which wasn't unusual, but he was one of the first coaches to encourage the "out" and let that spacing on the perimeter work for him and the team.

Robert Horry, as a stretchy 4 encouraged to take the open 3s that Hakeem's gravity provided, averaged 11.1 PPG on a 37.1 3P% and 4.6 3pt attempts per game.

To contrast, Horry only averaged 1.9 3pt attempts per game as a Laker. (Horry's 25 MPG on the Lakers vs. his 35 MPG on the Rocket's doesn't account for this discrepancy either.)

In today's NBA, Horry would have the spacing he had on the Rockets, and even more of a green light to take 3s (with far less defensive wear and tear from the big and bruising low post 4s of his era).

It is easy to imagine Horry playing like Bojan Bogdanović - taking 6-7 3pt attempts per game, hitting 38-39% from three, and averaging in the mid to late teens on PPG.


Good post

Yes. Really good! I was thinking along these lines of today's game and his fit. But, didn't have the words or insight to express it like this.
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Dreamshake
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 4:49 pm    Post subject:

Horry would have excelled in todays game as well. He wouldn’t have to bulk up to play the 4 position and still coulda maintained the bounce he had as a Rocket. He wouldn’t be a star but he’d be an ideal 3 and D player.

And he def was a top 5 player in Houston. Top 3 in 95 IMO.
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Barry Seal
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2022 6:14 pm    Post subject:

People forget that Horry was an athletic freak when he first came into the NBA. For a long time he was 2nd only behind Shaq in the SEC for career blocks.
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